Etymology
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stereoscope (n.)

1838, coined by inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) from stereo- + -scope. Instrument allowing binocular vision of two identical pictures that appear as a single image with relief and solidity. Related: Stereoscopy; stereoscopically.

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seminar (n.)
1887, "special group-study class for advanced students," from German Seminar "group of students working with a professor," from Latin seminarium "breeding ground, plant nursery" (see seminary). Sense of "meeting for discussion of a subject" first recorded 1944.
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ethnocentric (adj.)

"believing that one's own nation is the center of civilization," 1891, from ethno- + -centric; a technical term in social sciences until it began to be more widely used in the second half of the 20th century. Related: Ethnocentricity; ethnocentrism (1902).

Dr. Gumplowicz, professor of sociology at the University of Gratz, says that there are illusions which have been most baneful in the wider life of the world. He mentions two of them which, with real German facility for coining new names, he calls "acrochronism" and "ethnocentrism." ["Address of Professor J.C. Bracq," in "The Eighth Lake Mohonk Arbitration Conference," May 28, 1902; he adds, "Acrochronism is the illusion which leads us to think that what we are doing is the culminating point of some great process."]
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concertina (n.)

"portable, accordion-like musical instrument," 1835, from concert + fem. ending -ina. Invented 1829 by English inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (who also invented the stereoscope and the Wheatstone bridge). Concertina wire attested by 1917, so called from similarity to the musical instrument.

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taurine (n.)
also taurin, chemical substance (aminoethyl-sulphonic acid), 1845, from Latin taurus "bull" (see Taurus) + chemical suffix -ine (2); obtained by German professor Leopold Gmelin in 1826 and so called because it was first found in ox bile.
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Brythonic (adj.)
"of the (Celtic) Britons, Welsh," 1884, from Welsh Brython, cognate with English Briton, both from Latin Britto. Introduced into modern English by Welsh Celtic scholar Professor John Rhys (1840-1915) to avoid the confusion of using Briton/British with reference to ancient peoples, religions, and languages.
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Pusey 

family name, early 13c., from Le Puiset in France. Puseyism, Puseyite (1838) are in reference to the principles and teachings characteristic of the High-church party in the Church of England, originating at Oxford University in early 19c., so called for E.B. Pusey (1800-1882), professor of Hebrew there, who was one of its leaders.

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chair (n.)

"a seat with a back, intended for one person," early 13c., chaere, from Old French chaiere "chair, seat, throne" (12c.; Modern French chaire "pulpit, throne;" the more modest sense having gone since 16c. with variant form chaise), from Latin cathedra "seat" (see cathedral).

Figurative sense of "seat of office or authority" c. 1300 originally was of bishops and professors. Meaning "office of a professor" (1816) is extended from the seat from which a professor lectures (mid-15c.). Meaning "seat of a person presiding at meeting" is from 1640s. As short for electric chair from 1900. Chair-rail "strip or board of wood fastened to a wall at such a height as to prevent the plaster from being scraped by the backs of chairs" is from 1822.

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atopy (n.)
"type of abnormal hypersensitiveness," 1923, coined by Edward D. Perry, professor of Greek at Columbia University, at the request of medical men, from Greek atopia "unusualness, strangeness, a being out of the way," from atopos "out of place, strange, odd, eccentric," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + topos "place" (see topos).
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glucose (n.)
name of a group of sugars (in commercial use, "sugar-syrup from starch"), 1840, from French glucose (1838), said to have been coined by French professor Eugène Melchior Péligot (1811-1890) from Greek gleukos "must, sweet wine," related to glykys "sweet" (see gluco-). It first was obtained from grape sugar. Related: Glucosic.
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