Etymology
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primo 

1740 in music terms, "first, principal," from Italian primo "first, chief," from Latin primus "first" (see prime (adj.)). As slang for "excellent, first-class," perhaps an elaboration of prime (see O). Of drugs, by 1990s, street slang.

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primer (n.3)

"first layer of dye or paint," 1680s, agent noun from prime (v.).

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primus 

Latin for "first, the first;" see prime (adj.). In various phrases, e.g. primus inter pares "first among equals."

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primavera (n.)
"spring, spring time," Italian, from Latin prima vera, plural of primus ver literally "first spring;" see prime (adj.) + vernal. Related: Primaveral.
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autumnal (adj.)
1570s, "maturing or blooming in autumn;" 1630s, "belonging to autumn," from Latin autumnalis "pertaining to autumn," from autumnus (see autumn). From 1650s in figurative sense "past the prime."
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primer (n.1)

late 14c., "prayer-book, layperson's devotional manual," also "school book" (senses not distinguished in Middle English, as reading was taught from prayer books), from Medieval Latin primarium, from Latin primus "first" (see prime (adj.)), on the notion of "a first book." The word also might be all or in part from prime (n.) in the time sense on the same notion as a book of hours. Meaning "small introductory book on any topic" is from 1807.

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primigravida (n.)

"woman pregnant for the first time," 1879, from earlier use in German, from Modern Latin, from Latin primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + gravidus "laden, full, swollen, pregnant with child" (see gravid).

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priming (n.)

"first coat of paint or other material given to any surface," c. 1600, verbal noun from prime (v.). Meaning "act of priming a firearm" is by 1590s; that of "gunpowder in the pan of a firearm" is from 1620s.

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primipara (n.)

"woman who bears a child for the first time," 1842, Modern Latin, from Latin primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + parus, from parire "to produce, bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Related: Primiparity.

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Downing Street 
short street in London, named for British diplomat Sir George Downing (c. 1624-1684). It contains the residence of the prime minister (at Number 10), hence its metonymic use for "the British government," attested from 1781.
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