Etymology
Advertisement
mana (n.)

"power, authority, supernatural power," 1843, from Maori, "power, authority, supernatural power."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
manpower (n.)

also man-power, 1855, "the power of a man in work," from man (n.) + power (n.). Proposed in 1824 as a specific unit of measure of power. From 1917 as "the number of persons available for some purpose."

Related entries & more 
glove (n.)

Old English glof "glove, covering for the hand having separate sheaths for the fingers," also "palm of the hand," from Proto-Germanic *galofo "covering for the hand" (source also of Old Norse glofi), probably from *ga- collective prefix + *lofi "hand" (source also of Old Norse lofi, Middle English love, Gothic lofa "flat of the hand"), from PIE *lep- (2) "be flat; palm, sole, shoulder blade" (source also of Russian lopata "shovel;" Lithuanian lopa "claw," lopeta "shovel, spade").

German Handschuh, the usual word for "glove," literally "hand-shoe" (Old High German hantscuoh; also Danish and Swedish hantsche) is represented by Old English Handscio (the name of one of Beowulf's companions, eaten by Grendel), but this is attested only as a proper name. Meaning "boxing glove" is from 1847. Figurative use of fit like a glove is by 1771.

Related entries & more 
shuffleboard (n.)

also shuffle-board, 1530s, shovillaborde "shovel board," an unexplained alteration of shove-board (1520s), from shove (v.) + board (n.1). Originally a tabletop game (c. 1600), the large-scale version (1877) was improvised for play on ocean liners.

Related entries & more 
hydropower (n.)

"hydroelectric power," 1922, from hydro- (short for hydro-electric) + power (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
willpower (n.)

also will power, 1847, from will (n.) + power (n.).

Related entries & more 
puissance (n.)

early 15c., puissaunce, "power, strength, authority," from Old French puissance, poissance "power, might" (12c.), from puissant (see puissant).

Related entries & more 
firepower (n.)

also fire-power "effectiveness of military fire," 1891, from fire (n.) + power (n.).

Related entries & more 
horsepower (n.)

also horse-power, unit for measurement of the rate at which a motor works, 1805, from horse (n.) + power (n.); established by Watt as the power needed to lift 33,000 pounds one foot in one minute, which actually is about 1.5 times the power of a strong horse. Much abused in 19c. technical writing as "very fallacious," "shockingly unscientific," etc.

Related entries & more 
isocracy (n.)

"equal power," 1650s, from Greek isokratia "equality of political rights," from isokrates "of equal power, possessing equal rights with (others)," from isos "equal" (see iso-) + -kratia "power, rule, authority" (see -cracy). Related: Isocratic.

Related entries & more 

Page 2