Etymology
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cornfield (n.)

also corn-field, "field where corn is grown," late 13c. as a surname, from corn (n.1) + field (n.). In Great Britain a field in which any kind of grain is growing; in U.S. restricted to a field of Indian corn.

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champ (n.2)

"a field," c. 1300, from Old French champ, from Latin campus "flat land, field" (see campus).

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veldt (n.)
also veld, South African grassland, 1785, from Afrikaans, from older Dutch veld "field," from Proto-Germanic *felthuz "flat land" (see field (n.)).
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vole (n.)
1828, short for vole-mouse (1805, in an Orkneys book), literally "field-mouse," with first element probably from Old Norse völlr "field," from Proto-Germanic *walthuz (source also of Icelandic völlr, Swedish vall "field," Old English weald; see wold).
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fielding (n.)

"play in the field," 1823 in cricket (by 1867 in baseball), verbal noun from field (v.).

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Navajo 
Athabaskan people and language, 1780, from Spanish Apaches de Nabaju (1629), from Tewa (Tanoan) Navahu, said to mean literally "large field" or "large planted field," containing nava "field" and hu "valley." Spanish Navajo was used 17c. in reference to the area now in northwestern New Mexico.
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paddy (n.1)

1620s, "rice plant," from Malay (Austronesian) padi "rice in the straw." Main modern meaning "rice field, ground where rice is growing" (1948) is a shortening of paddy field.

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Pole (n.)

"inhabitant or native of Poland," 1650s, from German Pole, singular of Polen, from Polish Polanie "Poles," literally "field-dwellers," from pole "field," related to Old Church Slavonic polje "field" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread"). The older word was Polack.

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afield (adv.)

"in or to a field," 1590s, a contraction of Middle English prepositional phrase in felde, from Old English on felda "in the field" (especially of battle); see a- (1) + field (n.). Meaning "away from home, at a distance" is attested by early 15c.

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fielder (n.)
early 14c., "one who works in a field," agent noun from field (n.). Sporting sense is from 1832 (in cricket; by 1868 in baseball). Earlier in cricket was simply field (1825) and fieldsman (1767).
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