Etymology
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juxtaposition (n.)

"the act of placing or the state of being placed in nearness or contiguity," 1660s, from French juxtaposition (17c.), from Latin iuxta "beside, very near, close to, near at hand" + French position (see position (n.)). Latin iuxta is a contraction of *iugista (adv.), superlative of adjective *iugos "closely connected," from PIE root *yeug- "to join."

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post (n.2)

"station when on duty, a fixed position or place," 1590s, from French poste "place where one is stationed," also, "station for post horses" (16c.), from Italian posto "post, station," from Vulgar Latin *postum, from Latin positum, neuter past participle of ponere "to place, to put" (see position (n.)). Earliest sense in English was military; the meaning "job, position, position" is attested by 1690s. The military meaning "fort, permanent quarters for troops" is by 1703.

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interposition (n.)

late 14c., from Old French interposicion "interpolation, intercalation; suspension, break" (12c.), from Latin interpositionem (nominative interpositio) "an insertion," noun of action from past participle stem of interponere "to put between, place among; put forward," from inter "between" (see inter-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

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compositor (n.)

"a typesetter engaged in picking up, arranging, and distributing letters or type in a printing office," 1560s, agent noun from past participle stem of Latin componere "to put together, to collect a whole from several parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

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apposite (adj.)

1620s, "well-put or applied, appropriate," from Latin appositus, adpositus "contiguous, neighboring;" figuratively "fit, proper, suitable," past participle of apponere "lay beside, set near," especially "serve, set before," also "put upon, apply," from ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + ponere "to place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

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posture (n.)

c. 1600, "position, situation; disposition of the several parts of anything with respect to one another or a particular purpose," especially of the body, "pose," from French posture (16c.), from Italian postura "position, posture," from Latin positura "position, station," from postulus from past participle stem of ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). The figurative sense of "a state of being or attitude in relation to circumstances" is from 1640s. Related: Postural.

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deposit (v.)

1620s, "place in the hands of another as a pledge for a contract," from Latin depositus, past participle of deponere "lay aside, put down, deposit," also used of births and bets, from de "away" (see de-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). From 1650s as "lay away for safe-keeping;" from 1749 as "lay down, place, put." Related: Deposited; depositing.

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opponent (n.)

"one who opposes, an adversary, an antagonist," 1580s, from noun use of Latin opponentem (nominative opponens), present participle of opponere "oppose, object to," literally "set against, set opposite," from assimilated form of ob "in front of, in the way of" (see ob-) + ponere "to put, set, place" (see position (n.)). Originally "one who maintains a contrary argument in a disputation;" the general sense is by 1610s.

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deponent (adj.)

mid-15c., originally in Latin grammar (of verbs passive in form but active in sense), from Latin deponentem "putting down or aside," present participle of deponere "lay aside, put down, deposit," also used of births and bets, from de "away" (see de-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). As a noun, "a deponent verb," 1520s; as "one who makes a deposition," especially under oath, from 1540s.

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dispose (v.)

late 14c., disposen, "set in order, place in a particular order; give direction or tendency to; incline the mind or heart of," from Old French disposer (13c.) "arrange, order, control, regulate" (influenced in form by poser "to place"), from Latin disponere "put in order, arrange, distribute," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Related: Disposed; disposing.

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