Etymology
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salami (n.)

type of salted, flavored Italian sausage, 1852, from Italian salami, plural of salame "spiced pork sausage," from Vulgar Latin *salamen, from *salare "to salt," from Latin sal (genitive salis) "salt" (from PIE root *sal- "salt").

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tenderloin (n.)
1828, "tender part of a loin of pork or beef," from tender (adj.) + loin. The slang meaning "police district noted for vice" appeared first 1887 in New York, on the notion of the neighborhood of the chief theaters, restaurants, etc., being the "juciest cut" for graft and blackmail.
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Marrano (n.)

also Marano, "a Jew or Moor in Spain who, to avoid persecution, publicly professed conversion to Christianity while privately continuing in the practices and beliefs of their old religion," 1580s, from Spanish, probably literally "pig, swine," an expression of contempt, from Arabic muharram "forbidden thing" (eating of pork is forbidden by Muslim and Jewish religious law), from haruma "was forbidden" (see harem).

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frankfurter (n.)
"hot dog," 1894, American English, from German Frankfurter (wurst) "(sausage) of Frankfurt," so called because the U.S. product resembled a type of smoked-beef-and-pork sausage originally made in Germany, where it was associated with the city of Frankfurt am Main (literally "ford of the Franks" on the River Main). Attested from 1877 as Frankfort sausage.
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chop (n.)

mid-14c., "act of chopping, cutting with a quick blow," from chop (v.1). Meaning "piece cut off" is mid-15c.; specifically "slice of mutton, lamb, or pork" (usually cut from the loin and containing the rib) is from 1630s, probably from being "chopped" from the loin. Sense of "a blow, strike" is from 1550s. Specific cricket/baseball sense of "a downward stroke with the bat" is by 1888.

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carbonara (n.)

in cookery, a pasta dish served with a sauce made from eggs, olive oil, cream, cheese, and strips of bacon or ham, 1958, from Italian alla carbonara, which perhaps from carbonara "charcoal kiln," and meaning "cooked (as if) in a kiln, or from or influenced by carbonata "charcoal-grilled salt pork." Or it may be a reference somehow to the Carbonari, the 19c. secret society of Italian patriots.

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lard (v.)
"prepare (meat) for roasting by inserting pieces of salt pork, etc., into it," mid-14c., from Old French larder "to lard, cook with strips of bacon fat" (12c.), from larde "bacon fat" (see lard (n.)). The inserted bacon strip is a lardon or lardoon (from French). Figuratively, of speech or writing, "intersperse with material by way of ornament or improvement," from 1540s. Related: Larded; larding.
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healthy (adj.)

1550s, "being in a sound state;" also "conducive to health," from health + -y (2). Earlier in the same sense was healthsome (1530s). Related: Healthily; healthiness.

It is wrong to say that certain articles of food are healthy or unhealthy. Wholesome and unwholesome are the right words. A pig may be healthy or unhealthy while alive; but after he is killed and becomes pork, he can enjoy no health, and suffer no sickness. [Eliza Leslie, "Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book," Philadelphia, 1839]

Healthsome is from 1530s in the sense "bestowing health."

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rind (n.)

Old English rinde "bark of a tree or other plant," also figurative; also "a crust, firm outer coating or covering;" later "peel of a fruit or vegetable" (late 14c.), from Proto-Germanic *rind- (source also of Old Saxon rinda, Middle Dutch and Dutch rinde "bark of a tree," Old High German rinda "crust, bark," German Rinde "crust, crust of bread"), which is perhaps related to Old English rendan (source of rend (v.)); Boutkan suggests the group might be from a PIE root *(H)rendh-. The meaning "skin of a person or animal" (as in pork rind) is by 1510s.

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larder (n.)
c. 1300, "supply of salt pork, bacon, and other meats," later in reference to the room for processing and storing such (late 14c.), from Anglo-French larder, Old French lardier "tub for bacon, place for meats," from Medieval Latin lardarium "a room for meats," from Latin lardum "lard, bacon" (see lard (n.)).

Meaning "department of the royal household or of a monastic house in charge of stored meats" is mid-15c. Figurative use, in reference to a "storehouse" of anything, is by 1620s. Surname Lardner "person in charge of a larder" is attested from mid-12c., from Middle English lardyner, from Medieval Latin lardenarius "steward."
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