Etymology
Advertisement
master-work (n.)

c. 1600, "an action of chief importance;" 1610s, "a work of pre-eminent merit, a masterpiece," from master (n.) + work (n.). Probably based on a Dutch or German model (compare Middle Low German mesterwerk, German Meisterwerk).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
work-up (n.)

"diagnostic examination of a patient," 1961, from the verbal phrase; see work (v.) + up (adv.).

Related entries & more 
case-work (n.)
"social work carried out by the study of individuals," 1896, from case (n.1) in the clinical sense + work (n.). Related: Case-worker (1909).
Related entries & more 
watch-work (n.)
1660s, from watch (n.) in the "timepiece" sense + work (n.).
Related entries & more 
policeman (n.)

"one of the ordinary police, a police patrolman," 1790, from police (n.) + man (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Interpol 
1952, contraction of international police (in full, The International Criminal Police Commission), founded 1923 with headquarters in Paris.
Related entries & more 
DOA 
also d.o.a., 1929, police slang abbreviation of dead on arrival.
Related entries & more 
perp (n.)

1940s American English police jargon shortening of perpetrator (as in perp walk).

Related entries & more 
Gestapo 
Nazi secret state police, 1934, from German Gestapo, contracted from "Geheime Staats-polizei," literally "secret state police," set up by Hermann Göring in Prussia in 1933, extended to all Germany in January 1934.
Related entries & more 
patrolman (n.)
"police constable on a particular beat," 1841, from patrol (n.) + man (n.).
Related entries & more 

Page 2