Etymology
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potentiometer (n.)

"instrument for measuring the difference of electrical potential between two points," 1868, a hybrid formed from combining form of Latin potentia "power" (see potential) + Greek-derived -meter. Related: Potentiometric.

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rowel (n.)

"small, spinning wheel with radial points on a spur," mid-14c., rouel, from Old French roelle, roel (Modern French rouelle), "small wheel" (see roulette).

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barbed wire (n.)
also barb wire, "fencing wire with sharp edges or points," 1863, American English; see barb (n.) + wire (n.). Originally for the restraint of animals.
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isotherm (n.)
"line connecting points on the earth having the same mean temperature," 1850, from French isotherme (von Humboldt, 1817), from Greek isos "equal, identical" (see iso-) + therme "heat" (see thermal (adj.)).
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Zwinglian (adj.)
1532, after Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), Swiss Protestant reformer who revolted from the Roman communion in 1516 but who differed from Luther on theological points relating to the real presence in the Eucharist.
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due (adv.)

1590s, "duly," from due (adj.). In reference to points of the compass, "directly, exactly" (as in due east) it is attested from c. 1600, originally nautical, from notion of "fitting, rightful."

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quadricipital (adj.)

"having four heads or points of origin," by 1853, in reference to muscles, from Modern Latin; see quadri- "four" + Latin caput (genitive capitis) "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head").

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memoirs (n.)

"personal record of events, narrative of the facts or events of the life of a person or a phase of history written from personal knowledge or observation upon points about which the writer is specially informed," 1650s, plural of memoir.

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gaff (n.2)
"talk," 1812, in phrase blow the gaff "spill a secret," of uncertain origin. OED points out Old English gafspræc "blasphemous or ribald speech," and Scottish gaff "loud, rude talk" (by 1825). Compare gaffe.
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minatory (adj.)

"expressing a threat," 1530s, from French minatoire, from Late Latin minatorius "threatening," from minat-, stem of Latin minari "to threaten; jut, project," from minæ "threats; projecting points," from PIE root *men- (2) "to project." Related: Minatorially.

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