Etymology
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psycho (n.)

1925 as short for psychologist; (earlier short for psychology, 1921); as short for psychopath by 1942.

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eighty-six (v.)
slang for "eliminate," 1936, originated at lunch counters, a cook's word for "none" when asked for something not available, probably rhyming slang for nix.
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gamekeeper (n.)
one who has responsibility for animals kept for sport, 1660s, from game (n.) in the "wild animal caught for sport" sense + keeper.
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nonce (n.)

in phrase for the nonce (Middle English for þe naness, c. 1200) "for a special occasion, for a particular purpose," a misdivision (see N for other examples) of for þan anes "for the once," in reference to a particular occasion or purpose, the þan being an altered form of the Middle English dative definite article þam (see the). The phrase was used from early 14c. as an empty filler in metrical composition.

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Oxfam (n.)

1963, short for Oxford Committee for Famine Relief.

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saving (prep., conj.)

"except for; but for; minus," also "with due respect or consideration for" (one's honor, etc.), late 14c.; see save (prep.).

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therefor (adv.)
"for this, for that," Middle English variant spelling of therefore (q.v.); in modern use perhaps perceived as there + for.
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Pat 
as a fem. proper name, short for Patricia. As a masc. proper name, short for Patrick; hence a nickname for any Irishman.
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Hob 
c. 1300, Hobbe, a variant of Rob, diminutive of Robert (compare Hick for Richard, Hodge for Rodger, etc.). Also a generic proper name for one of the common class.
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showroom (n.)
"room for displaying furniture for sale," 1610s, from show (v.) + room (n.).
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