Etymology
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gunplay (n.)
also gun-play, 1891, from gun (n.) + play (n.).
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long-playing (adj.)
1910, of gramophone recordings, from long (adv.) + present participle of play (v.).
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playback (n.)

"reproduction of a recording," 1929, from the verbal phrase; see play (v.) + back (adv.).

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interplay (n.)
1838, from inter- "between" + play (n.). "Reciprocal play," thus "free interaction."
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screenplay (n.)
1916, from screen (n.) in the cinematic sense + play (n.).
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playfellow (n.)

also play-fellow, "companion in amusements or sports," 1510s, from play (n.) + fellow (n.).

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playhouse (n.)

"theater, house appropriated to dramatic performances," late Old English pleghus; see play (n.) + house (n.).

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airplay (n.)
1950 in radio sense, from air (n.1) + play.
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wordplay (n.)
also word-play, 1855; see word (n.) + play (v.).
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playwright (n.)

"writer or adapter of plays for the stage," 1680s (Ben Jonson used it 1610s as a mock-name), from play (n.) + wright (n.).

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