Etymology
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plash (v.2)

"to interlace, to bend and interweave the branches or twigs of," late 15c. (implied in plashing), from Old French plaissier, from Latin plectere "to plait," from suffixed form of PIE root *plek- "to plait." Related: Plashed.

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implex (adj.)
"intricate, complicated," 1710, from Latin implexus "interwoven, entwined," past participle of implectere, from assimilated form of in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + plectere "to plait, twine, braid" (from suffixed form of PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Used by 18c. critics in reference to plots.
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flax (n.)
Old English fleax "flax plant; cloth made with flax, linen," from Proto-Germanic *flakhsan (source also of Old Frisian flax, Middle Dutch and Dutch vlas, Old Saxon flas, Old High German flahs, German Flachs), probably from Proto-Germanic base *fleh- "to plait," from PIE root *plek- "to plait." But some connect it with PIE *pleik- (see flay) from the notion of "stripping" fiber to prepare it.
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triplicate (adj.)
early 15c., "triple, threefold," from Latin triplicatus, past participle of triplicare "to triple," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").
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explicate (v.)
"give a detailed account of," 1530s, from Latin explicatus, past participle of explicare "unfold, unravel, explain," from ex "out" (see ex-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Related: Explicated; explicating.
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-plex 
word-forming element, from Latin -plex, from PIE root *plek- "to plait." De Vaan writes, "Probably, duplex was the archetype of this category of compounds."
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quadruplicate (adj.)

"fourfold, four times repeated," 1650s, from Latin quadruplicatus, past participle of quadruplicare "make fourfold," from quadri- "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

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ply (v.2)

"to bend, yield," late 14c., plien, from Old French plier, earlier pleier "to fold, bend," from Latin plicare "to lay, fold, twist" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Related: Plied; plies; plying.

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explicative (adj.)

1640s, "having the function of explaining," from Latin explicativus, from explicat-, past participle stem of explicare "unfold; explain," from ex "out" (see ex-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). As a noun, from 1775.

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explication (n.)

"explanation," especially of the meaning of a sentence or passage, literally "an unfolding," 1520s, from French explication, from Latin explicationem (nominative explicatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of explicare "unfold; explain," from ex "out" (see ex-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

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