Etymology
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soft-hearted (adj.)
also softhearted, 1590s, from soft (adj.) "tender" + -hearted. Related: Soft-heartedly; soft-heartedness.
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broken-hearted (adj.)
also brokenhearted, "depressed or crushed by grief of despair," 1520s, from broken + -hearted. Related: Broken-heartedly; broken-heartedness.
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black-hearted (adj.)
"having a cruel or malicious heart," 1792, from black (adj.) + -hearted. Greek had the same image in melanokardios. Related: black-heartedly.
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half-hearted (adj.)
also halfhearted, "showing little enthusiasm," early 15c.; see half + -hearted. Related: halfheartedly; halfheartedness. English in 17c. also had half-headed "stupid."
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kind-hearted (adj.)
also kindhearted, 1530s; see kind (adj.) + -hearted. Related: Kindheartedly, kindheartedness.
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cold-hearted (adj.)

"wanting sympathy, unkind," c. 1600, from cold (adj.) + -hearted. Originally in Shakespeare. Compare cold-blooded. Old English had cealdheort (adj.) "cruel." Related: Cold-heartedly; cold-heartedness.

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faint-hearted (adj.)
"cowardly, timorous," c. 1400, from faint (adj.) + -hearted. Related: Faint-heartedly; faint-heartedness; faint-heart.
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great-hearted (adj.)
"of noble courage," late 14c., from great (adj.) + -hearted.
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hard-hearted (adj.)
also hardhearted, "obdurate, unfeeling," c. 1200, heard-iheorted," from hard (adj.) + -hearted. Sometimes in Middle English also meaning "bold, courageous" (c. 1400). Related: Hard-heartedly; hard-heartedness. In late Old English and early Middle English, hard-heort meant both "hard-hearted" (adj.) and "hard-hearted person" (n.).
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wholehearted (adj.)
also whole-hearted, 1840, from whole (adj.) + -hearted. Related: Wholeheartedly.
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