Etymology
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picador (n.)

in bullfighting, one of the horsemen, armed with a lance, who commence the combat by pricking the animal to madness with their weapons, 1797, from Spanish picador, literally "pricker," from picar "to pierce," from Vulgar Latin *piccare "to pierce" (see pike (n.1)).

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piquant (adj.)

1520s, "sharp or stinging to the feelings" (a sense now obsolete), from French piquant "pricking, stimulating, irritating," present participle of piquer "to prick, sting, nettle" (see pike (n.1)). From 1640s as "of agreeable pungency or sharpness of taste or flavor;" by 1690s as "of smart, lively, or racy nature." Related: Piquantly.

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picaresque (adj.)

"pertaining to or dealing with rogues or knaves and their adventures," especially in literary productions, 1810, from Spanish picaresco "roguish," from picaro "rogue," a word of uncertain origin, possibly from picar "to pierce," from Vulgar Latin *piccare (see pike (n.1)). Originally in roman picaresque "rogue novel," the classic example being "Gil Blas."

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pitchfork (n.)

"fork for lifting and pitching" (hay, etc.), commonly with a long handle and two prongs, mid-14c., altered (by influence of pichen "to throw, thrust;" see pitch (v.1)) from Middle English pic-forken (c. 1200), from pik (see pike (n.2)) + fork (n.). The verb, "to lift or throw with a pitchfork," is attested from 1837.

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turnpike (n.)

early 15c., "spiked road barrier used for defense," from turn + pike (n.2) "shaft." Sense transferred to "horizontal cross of timber, turning on a vertical pin" (1540s), which were used to bar horses from foot roads. This led to the sense of "barrier to stop passage until a toll is paid" (1670s). Meaning "road with a toll gate" is from 1748, shortening of turnpike road (1745).

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piker (n.)

1872, "miserly person," formerly "poor white migrant to California" (1860), earlier Pike (1854), perhaps originally "vagrant who wanders the pike (n.4)" (which is the notion in Sussex dialectal piker "vagrant, tramp, gypsy," 1838), but Barnhart, OED and others suggest the American English word ultimately is a reference to people from Pike County, Missouri. Its appearance seems too late to connect it with Middle English piker "robber, petty thief" (c. 1300, attested as late as 1549 in OED), from the source of pick (v.) in its sense of "steal, rob, plunder" (early 14c.) with its former long vowel.

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picket (n.)

1680s, "pointed post or stake (usually of wood, for defense against cavalry, etc.)," from French piquet "pointed stake," from piquer "to pierce" (see pike (n.1)). Also "one of a number of pointed bars used to make a fence," hence picket-fence (1817). The sense of "troops posted in front of an army to give notice of the approach of the enemy" is recorded from 1761; that of "striking workers stationed to prevent others from entering a factory" is from 1867. Picket-line is by 1856 in the military sense, by 1945 of labor strikes.

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pique (n.)

1530s, "slight offense taken; feeling of displeasure, resentment, etc. arising from wounded pride, vanity, or self-love," from French pique "a prick, sting, irritation," noun of action from piquer (see pike (n.1)).

Pique is more likely to be a matter of injured self-respect or self-conceit ; it is a quick feeling, and is more fugitive in character. Umbrage is founded upon the idea of being thrown into the shade or over-shadowed ; hence it has the sense of offense at being slighted or not sufficiently recognized ; it is indefinite as to the strength or the permanence of the feeling. [Century Dictionary]
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peak (n.)

1520s, "pointed top, projecting summit," a variant of pike (n.4) "sharp point." Meaning "top of a mountain, a precipitous mountain with a more or less conical summit" is recorded by 1630s, though pike was used in this sense c. 1400. Figurative sense is 1784. Of beards, 1590s; of hats, 1650s. Meaning "point formed by hair on the forehead" is from 1833. As "the highest point" in any varying quantity, or the time when this occurs, by 1902. 

The Peak, the prominent hill in Derbyshire, England, is older than the word for "mountaintop;" compare Old English Peaclond, for the district, Pecsaetan, for the people who settled there, Peaces ærs for Peak Cavern. In this case it is sometimes said to be a reference to an elf-denizen Peac "Puck."

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pink (v.)

c. 1200, pungde "to pierce, puncture, stab with a pointed weapon," later (early 14c.) "make holes in; spur a horse," of uncertain origin; perhaps from a nasalized form of the Romanic stem that also yielded French piquer "to prick, pierce," Spanish picar (see pike (n.1)). Or perhaps from Old English pyngan and directly from its source, Latin pungere "to prick, pierce" (from suffixed form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). Related: Pinked; pinking.

Later "to decorate (a garment, leather) by making small holes in a regular pattern at the edge or elsewhere" (c. 1500). Surviving mainly in pinking shears (by 1934).

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