Etymology
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pidgin (n.)

1876, "artificial jargon of corrupted English with a few Chinese, Portuguese, and Malay words, arranged according to the Chinese idiom, used by the Chinese and foreigners for colloquial convenience in business transactions in the ports of China and the Far East," from pigeon English (1859), the name of the reduced form of English used in China for communication with Europeans, from pigeon, pidgin "business, affair, thing" (1826), itself a pidgin word (with altered spelling based on pigeon), representing a Chinese pronunciation of business. The meaning was extended by 1891 to "any simplified language."

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garbanzo (n.)

"chick-pea," 1759 (from 1712 as garvanzo), from Spanish garbanzo, which is said to be ultimately from Greek or Basque.

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Jonas 

masc. proper name, from Late Latin Jonas, from Greek Ionas, from Hebrew yonah "dove, pigeon" (compare Jonah).

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mesquite (n.)

type of American shrub of the pea family, found from Texas and California to Chile, 1759, from Mexican Spanish mezquite, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) mizquitl "mesquite." It is noted for its heavy, hard wood.

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pease 

"peas collectively," Old English; see pea, of which this is the original form. Pease-porridge "a porridge made of pease meal" is from 1530s.

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ring-dove (n.)

"wood-pigeon," a common European bird, 1530s, from ring (n.1) + dove (v.). It has a ring-shaped marking around the neck.

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row (n.2)

"noisy commotion," 1746, Cambridge student slang, of uncertain origin, perhaps related to rousel "drinking bout" (c. 1600), a shortened form of carousal. Klein suggests a back-formation from rouse (n.), mistaken as a plural (compare pea from pease).

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Reuters (n.)

news service begun in London 1851 by Baron Paul Julius von Reuter (1816-1899), who in Aachen in 1849 had founded a telegraph office and pigeon post bureau. For the surname, see rutter.

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homing (n.)

"action of going home," 1765, in reference to pigeons, verbal noun from home (v.). Of aircraft, later missiles, from 1923. Homing pigeon attested by 1868.

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carrier (n.)

late 14c., "one who or that which conveys," agent noun from carry (v.). The meaning "person or animal that carries and disseminates infection without suffering obvious disease" is from 1899; genetic sense is 1933. As a short form of aircraft carrier it dates from 1917. Carrier-pigeon, one of a breed trained to convey from one place to another written messages tied to its leg (also homing-pigeon), is from 1640s.

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