Etymology
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de jure 

Latin, literally "of law," thus "legitimate, lawful, by right of law, according to law." Jure is ablative of ius "law" (see de +  just (adj.)).

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de rigueur 
1849, French, literally "of strictness," thus "according to obligation of convention." See rigor.
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de minimis 
Latin, literally "of little things," thus, "so minor as to not be worth regarding."
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de-accession (v.)

also deaccession, "remove an entry for an item from the register of a museum, library, etc." (often a euphemism for "to sell"), by 1968, from de- "off, away" + accession, which had been used since 1887 in library publications as a verb meaning "to add to a catalogue." Related: De-accessioned; de-accessioning.

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de-bamboozle (v.)

"undeceive, disabuse," 1919; see de- "do the opposite of" + bamboozle.

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de-ice (v.)

"remove the ice from," 1935, from de- + ice. Related: De-iced; de-icing. Agent noun de-icer is from 1932, originally of airplanes.

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de-orbit (v.)

of a spacecraft, "to leave or move out of orbit," 1958, from de- + orbit. Related: De-orbited; de-orbiting.

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de-anglicize (v.)

"to render un-English or less English," 1876; see de- "do the opposite of" + anglicize. Related: De-anglicised; de-anglicized; de-anglicizing.

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de-emphasize (v.)

also deemphasize, "reduce the importance or prominence of," 1938, from de- "opposite of" + emphasize. Related: De-emphasized; de-emphasizing. De-emphasis (n.) is from 1940.

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