Etymology
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tableau (n.)

1690s, "a picturesque or graphic description or picture," from French tableau "picture, painting" (12c.), from Old French table "slab, writing tablet" (see table (n.)) + diminutive suffix -eau, from Latin -ellus. Hence tableau-vivant (1817) "person or persons silent and motionless, enacting a well-known scene, incident, painting, etc.," 19c. parlor game, literally "living picture."

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matte (n.1)

"backing for a picture," 1845, from French; see mat (n.2).

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screenplay (n.)

"script from which a motion picture is made," 1916, from screen (n.) in the cinematic sense + play (n.).

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cinematographer (n.)

1897, "one who takes cinematic pictures," agent noun from cinematograph "motion picture projector" (see cinema).

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cyanotype (n.)

"photograph picture obtained by the use of cyanide," 1842, from cyan- + ending from daguerreotype (see type (n.)).

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image (v.)

late 14c., "to form a mental picture (of something), imagine," from Old French imagier, from image (see image (n.)). Related: Imaged; imaging.

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painting (n.)

c. 1200, "that which is painted, a picture depicted with paint," verbal noun from paint (v.). From late 14c. as "art of depicting by means of paint."

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imaginable (adj.)

late 14c., ymaginable, from Old French imaginable and directly from Late Latin imaginabilis, from Latin imaginari "picture to oneself" (see imagine). Related: Imaginably.

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monotype (n.)

1881 in biology, "the single or sole type of a species in its genus, a genus in its family, etc.;" 1882 in printers' arts, "a print from a picture painted on a metal plate" (only one proof can be made, as the picture is transferred to the paper); 1893 as a brand name of typesetting machine; see mono- + type. Related: Monotypic (1878 in the biological sense)

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imagine (v.)

mid-14c., "to form a mental image of," from Old French imaginer "sculpt, carve, paint; decorate, embellish" (13c.), from Latin imaginari "to form a mental picture, picture to oneself, imagine" (also, in Late Latin imaginare "to form an image of, represent"), from imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Sense of "suppose, assume" is first recorded late 14c. Related: Imagined; imagining.

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