Etymology
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humorous (adj.)

early 15c., in physiology and medicine, "relating to the body humors, characterized by an abundance of humors," a native formation from humor (n.), or else from Medieval Latin humorosus. In Shakespeare also "whimsical, full of fancies" (1580s); "ill-humored, peevish, moody" (c. 1600). The meaning "funny, exciting laughter" dates from 1705 in English. Related: Humorously; humorousness.

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secretion (n.)

1640s, in animal physiology, "act of preparing and expressing substances by glandular activity;" 1732 as "that which is secreted," from French sécrétion, from Latin secretionem (nominative secretio) "a dividing, separation," noun of action from past participle stem of secernere "to separate, set apart" (see secret (n.)).

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fibril (n.)
1680s, Englishing of Modern Latin fibrilla "a little fiber, a filament," especially in botany, diminutive of Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber). Latin fibra and fibrilla were used in 17c. physiology in English alongside nativized fibre and fibril. From 1931 as "thread-like molecular formation."
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bursa (n.)
by 1788 as an English word in physiology, shortened from medieval Latin bursa mucosa "mucus pouch," from Medieval Latin bursa "bag, purse," from Late Latin bursa, variant of byrsa "hide," from Greek byrsa "hide, skin, wine-skin, drum," which is of unknown origin; compare purse (n.). Related: Bursal (1751).
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lymph (n.)

in physiology, "colorless fluid found in animal bodies," 1725, from French lymphe (16c.), from Latin lympha "water, clear water, a goddess of water," variant of lumpæ "waters," altered by influence of Greek nymphē "goddess of a spring, nymph."

The same word was used earlier in English in the classical sense "pure water, water" (1620s) and with reference to colorless fluids in plants (1670s). Also see lymphatic. Lymph node is attested by 1874.

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lacto- 
before vowels, lac-, word-forming element used in chemistry and physiology from 19c. and meaning "milk," from Latin lac (genitive lactis) "milk," from Proto-Italic *(g)lagt-, from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk." This and the separate root *melg- (source of milk (n.)) account for words for "milk" in most of the Indo-European languages. The absence of a common word for it is considered a mystery. Middle Irish lacht, Welsh llaeth "milk" are loan words from Latin.
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consensus (n.)

1854, "a general accord or agreement of different parts in effecting a given purpose," originally a term in physiology; 1861, of persons "a general agreement in opinion;" from Latin consensus "agreement, accord," past participle of consentire "feel together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sentire "to feel" (see sense (n.)). There is an isolated instance of the word from 1633.

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cotyledon (n.)

from 1540s in physiology, later in botany, used in various sense, from Latin cotyledon "pennywort, navelwort," from Greek kotyledon "cup-shaped cavity," used of various holes, also "sucker, suction cup," also a plant name, from kotylē "bowl, dish, small cup," also the name of a small liquid measure (nearly a half-pint), in transferred use, "socket, especially of the hip-joint;" a word of uncertain origin [Beekes finds it probably Pre-Greek]. Botanical sense is 1776, from Linnaeus (1751). Related: Cotyledonal.

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assimilate (v.)

early 15c., in physiology, "absorb into and make part of the body," from Latin assimilatus, past participle of assimilare, assimulare "to make like, copy, imitate, assume the form of; feign, pretend," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + simulare "make similar," from similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar).

The meaning "make alike, cause to resemble," and the intransitive sense "become incorporated into" are from 1620s. In linguistics, "bring into accordance or agreement in speech," from 1854. Related: Assimilated; assimilating.

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parenchyma (n.)

"the proper tissue or substance of any organ or part," as distinguished from connective tissue, etc., 1650s, Modern Latin, from Greek parenkhyma "something poured in beside," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + enkhyma "infusion," from en- "in" + khein "to pour" (from PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). In ancient physiology, the stuff that was supposed to make up the liver, lungs, etc., which was believed to be formed from blood strained through the capillaries and congealed. Related: Parenchymal; parenchymous.

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