Etymology
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complementarity (n.)

"a complementary relation or situation," 1908, a term in physics, from complementary + -ity.

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geophysical (adj.)
"relating to the physics of the earth," 1885; see geophysics + -al (1).
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astrophysicist (n.)
"expert in the physics of heavenly bodies," also astro-physicist, 1869, from astro- + physicist. Related: Astrophysics (1877); astrophysical.
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pneumatics (n.)

"the branch of physics which treats of the mechanical properties of gases, especially of atmospheric air," 1650s, from pneumatic. Also see -ics.

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physicochemical (adj.)

also physico-chemical, "pertaining to or relating to both physics and chemistry," 1660s, from physico- + chemical (adj.).

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gravitation (n.)
1640s in physics, "force that gives weight to objects," also figurative, "act of tending toward a center of attraction," from Modern Latin gravitare (see gravitate). Compare gravity.
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-tron 
word-forming element in compounds coined in physics, "having to do with electrons or subatomic particles," 1939, abstracted unetymologically from electron (Greek -tron was an instrumentive suffix).
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mesic (adj.)

1926, in ecology, "characterized by a moderate amount of moisture," from Greek mesos "middle" (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle") + -ic. From 1939 in physics, "of or pertaining to a meson" (see meson).

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enthalpy (n.)
1927 in physics, from Greek enthalpein "to warm in," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + thalpein "to heat," from thalpos "warmth, heat," especially "summer heat."
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aerosol (n.)
1919, from aero- "air" + first syllable in solution, in the chemical sense. A term in physics; modern commercial application is from 1940s.
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