Etymology
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P.E. 

also PE, by 1956 as an abbreviation of physical education (see physical). Earlier it stood for Protestant Episcopal.

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objectify (v.)

"present as an object," especially as an object of sense, by 1838, from Medieval Latin obiectum (see object (n.)) + -fy. Related: Objectified; objectifying.

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physico- 

word-forming element meaning "physical, physically; natural," from Latinized form of Greek physikos "natural, physical, pertaining to nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow"). Compare physic.

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objectification (n.)

"act or process of making or presenting (someone or something) as an object, especially an object of sense," by 1860, noun of action from objectify.

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objet (n.)

"an object on display as an ornament," 1857, from French objet (14c.), especially in objet d'art, from Latin obiectus (see object (n.)). In English, objet d'art is attested from 1865. 

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form (n.)
c. 1200, forme, fourme, "semblance, image, likeness," from Old French forme, fourme, "physical form, appearance; pleasing looks; shape, image; way, manner" (12c.), from Latin forma "form, contour, figure, shape; appearance, looks; a fine form, beauty; an outline, a model, pattern, design; sort, kind condition," a word of unknown origin. One theory holds that it is from or cognate with Greek morphe "form, beauty, outward appearance" (see Morpheus) via Etruscan [Klein].

From c. 1300 as "physical shape (of something), contour, outline," of a person, "shape of the body;" also "appearance, likeness;" also "the imprint of an object." From c. 1300 as "correct or appropriate way of doing something; established procedure; traditional usage; formal etiquette." Mid-14c. as "instrument for shaping; a mould;" late 14c. as "way in which something is done," also "pattern of a manufactured object." Used widely from late 14c. in theology and Platonic philosophy with senses "archetype of a thing or class; Platonic essence of a thing; the formative principle." From c. 1300 in law, "a legal agreement; terms of agreement," later "a legal document" (mid-14c.). Meaning "a document with blanks to be filled in" is from 1855. From 1590s as "systematic or orderly arrangement;" from 1610s as "mere ceremony." From 1550s as "a class or rank at school" (from sense "a fixed course of study," late 14c.). Form-fitting (adj.) in reference to clothing is from 1893.
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bod (n.)
1788, "a person," short for body. Meaning "physical body" is recorded from 1933.
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nurturance (n.)

"emotional and physical care," 1938, from nurture + -ance. Related: Nurturant.

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viewpoint (n.)
1856, of mental positions; 1858 in a physical sense, from view + point (n.).
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objective (adj.)
1610s, originally in the philosophical sense of "considered in relation to its object" (opposite of subjective), formed on pattern of Medieval Latin objectivus, from objectum "object" (see object (n.)) + -ive. Meaning "impersonal, unbiased" is first found 1855, influenced by German objektiv. Related: Objectively.
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