Etymology
Advertisement
Avicenna 
Latinization of name of Ibn Sina (980-1037), Persian philosopher and physician. Full name Abū 'Alī al-Husayn ibn 'Abd Allāh ibn Sīnā al-Balkhī.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Nietzschean (adj.)

1904, in reference to the ideas or followers of German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900). The surname is probably a diminutive of Nikolaus.

Related entries & more 
Aristotelian (adj.)
also Aristotelean, c. 1600, of or pertaining to the person or teachings of Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 B.C.E.), the father of logic.
Related entries & more 
performative 

"of or pertaining to performance," 1955, adjective and noun, coined by British philosopher of language J.L. Austin (1911-1960), from perform + -ive, perhaps on model of informative.

Related entries & more 
Hakeem 
also Hakim, masculine proper name, from Arabic hakim "wise," as a noun "physician; philosopher; governor," from stem of hakuma "he was wise;" whence also hakam "judge," hikmah "wisdom, science."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Panglossian (adj.)

"optimistic" (usually ironic or disparaging), 1831, from French Panglosse, the name of the philosopher and tutor in Voltaire's "Candide" (1758), from pan- "all" (see pan-) + Greek glōssa, literally "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).

Related entries & more 
deschooling (n.)

"act or process of removing the function of education from conventional schools to non-institutional systems of learning," 1970, coined by Austrian-born U.S. anarchist philosopher Ivan Illich (1926-2002), from de- + schooling.

Related entries & more 
pheme (n.)

"a word regarded as a grammatical unit in a language," 1906, coined by U.S. philosopher Charles S. Pierce (1839-1914), from Greek phēmē "speech, voice, utterance, a speaking" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

Related entries & more 
sociology (n.)
the science of social phenomena, 1842, from French sociologie, a hybrid coined 1830 by French philosopher Isidore Auguste Comte (1798-1857), from Latin socius "associate" (see social (adj.)) + Greek-derived suffix -logie (see -logy).
Related entries & more 
sage (n.2)

"wise man, man of profound wisdom, venerable man known as a grave philosopher," mid-14c., from sage (adj.). Originally applied to the Seven Sages — Thales, Solon, Periander, Cleobulus, Chilon, Bias, and Pittacus — men of ancient Greece renowned for practical wisdom.

Related entries & more 

Page 2