Etymology
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Emmanuel 

masc. personal name, from Greek form of Hebrew 'Immanu'el, literally "God is with us," from 'immanu "with us," from 'im "with," + first person plural pronominal suffix, + El "God."

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Darby 

masc. personal name, representing a southern England pronunciation of Derby. Also see Joan. Darbies, slang for "handcuffs," is by 1670s, implied in other forms from 1570s, but the association is obscure.

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Rouen 

city in northern France, Roman Rotomagus, in which the second element is Gaulish magos "field, market." The first is roto "wheel," perhaps reflecting the Gaulish love of chariot-racing, or else it is a personal name.

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Harvard 

U.S. college named for John Harvard (1607-1638), Puritan immigrant minister who bequeathed half his estate and 260 books to the yet-unorganized college that had been ordered by the Massachusetts colonial government. The surname is cognate with Hereward, Old English hereweard, literally "army guard."

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Vauxhall 

popular pleasure garden on south bank of Thames in London, c. 1661-1859; the name is Middle English Faukeshale (late 13c.), "Hall or manor of a man called Falkes," an Old French personal name.

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Ephraim 

masc. personal name, in Old Testament the younger son of Joseph, also the name of the tribe descended from him, and sometimes used figuratively for "Kingdom of Israel;" Greek form of Hebrew Ephrayim, a derivative of parah "was fruitful" (related to Aramaic pera "fruit").

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Camembert (n.)

type of rich, sweet, yellowish cream-cheese, 1867, from the name of a village near Argentan, Normandy, where it originally was made (the modern form of the cheese dates to 1792). The place name is Medieval Latin Campus Maimberti "field of Maimbert" (a West Germanic personal name).

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Clara 

fem. personal name, from Latin Clara, fem. of clarus "bright, shining, clear" (see clear (adj.) and compare Claire). Derivatives include Clarisse, Clarice, Clarabel, Claribel. The native form Clare was common in medieval England, perhaps owing to the popularity of St. Clare of Assisi.

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Carnaby Street (n.)

street in Soho, London (Westminster), in mid-1960s lined with fashionable boutiques and clothing shops, hence used figuratively from 1964 for "(contemporary) English stylishness." It was named for Karnaby House, built 1683, from a surname or transferred from Carnaby in Yorkshire, which is from a Scandinavian personal name + -by (see by).

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Geoffrey 

masc. personal name, attested in England by late 11c., from Old French Geuffroi, from Medieval Latin Gaufridus, from Old High German gewi "district" (German Gau; see gau) + fridu "peace" (from Proto-Germanic *frithu- "peace," from suffixed form of PIE root *pri- "to love").

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