Etymology
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personalize (v.)

also personalise, "make personal, make (something) more obviously related to a particular individual," 1747, from personal + -ize. Related: Personalized; personalizing.

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leasehold (n.)
also lease-hold, "a tenure by lease, real estate held under a lease," 1720, from lease (n.) + hold (n.). Related: Leaseholder.
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thorp (n.)
Old English ðorp "village, hamlet, farm, estate," reinforced by Old Norse ðorp, both from Proto-Germanic *thurpa- (source also of Old Frisian thorp, Frisian terp, Middle Dutch, Dutch dorp, German dorf "village," Gothic þaurp "estate, land, field"), probably from PIE root *treb- "dwelling" (see tavern). Preserved in place names ending in -thorp, -thrup.
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idiolect (n.)
one's personal way of using a language, 1948, from idio- "one's own, personal" + second element abstracted from dialect. Idioglottic (1888) has a sense "using words invented in one's mind" (from Greek glotta/glossa "tongue").
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Realtor (n.)

1916, "real estate agent," American English, as though an agent noun from realty, coined by real estate agent Charles N. Chadbourn of Minneapolis, Minn., to distinguish the legitimate section of the business; popularized 1920s; patented as Realtor by the National Association of Real Estate Boards.

The 1916 Convention of the National Association of Real Estate Boards (NAREB) approved the adoption of the term as the official designation of an active member of the Association. In 1920 the District Court of Hennepin County, Minnesota, decided in favor of the Realtors in a case against a telephone directory publisher that had indiscriminately used the word in listings. The court asserted that the word "had never been used in any way whatsoever until so invented" and could thus be used only by those duly licensed by the National Association of Real Estate Boards. Until the Lanham Acts of 1948 changed federal patent regulations to allow protection for registered collective marks, the National Association fought and won sixteen cases on the local and state levels to protect its symbolic property. [Jeffrey M. Hornstein, "The Rise of Realtor," in "The Middling Sorts: Explorations in the History of the American Middle Class," New York, 2001]
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Gravenstein 
apple variety, 1802, from Gravenstein, German form of the name of a village and ducal estate (Danish Graasten) in Schleswig-Holstein.
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time-sharing (n.)
1953, as a computing term, from time (n.) + verbal noun from share (v.). In real estate, as an arrangement in property use, it is recorded from 1976.
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memoirs (n.)

"personal record of events, narrative of the facts or events of the life of a person or a phase of history written from personal knowledge or observation upon points about which the writer is specially informed," 1650s, plural of memoir.

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millage (n.)

"rate of (real estate) taxation in mills per dollar of assessed value," 1871, U.S., from mill (n.2) + -age.

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depersonalization (n.)

also depersonalisation, "loss of personality, a treating as though not having a personal identity," 1893, noun of action from depersonalize "regard as not individually personal;" see de- "do the opposite of" +  personalize. Related: Depersonalized; depersonalizing.

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