Etymology
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menhir (n.)

"ancient upright monumental stone," very abundant in Brittany but also found in other places, 1834, from French menhir (19c.), from Breton, literally "long stone," from men "stone" + hir "long," from PIE *se-ro-, from root *se- "long, late" (see soiree). Cognate with Welsh maen hir, Cornish medn hir.

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rpm 
1906, initialism (acronym) from revolutions per minute.
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seaside (n.)

also sea-side, "the land bordering on the sea, the margin or brim of the sea," c. 1200, from sea + side (n.). Especially in England, "the seacoast as a resort for pleasure or health," 1782; as an adjective in this sense from 1781. The meaning "the side facing the sea" seems to be late (19c.) and rare.

Other Middle English "seaside, seashore" words included sees koste (mid-14c.), sewarth (Old English sæwaroþ, from wār "seashore, beach"), se-ground, se-brimme, sæ-strand, sea-half (Old English sæhealf), se-bank (mid-14c.). Old English used særima "sea-rim," sæ-strande, etc.

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sedulous (adj.)

"diligent in application or pursuit of an object," 1530s, from Latin sedulus "attentive, painstaking, diligent, busy, zealous," probably from sedulo (adv.) "sincerely, diligently," from sedolo "without deception or guile," from se- "without, apart" (see se-) + dolo, ablative of dolus "deception, guile," which is cognate with Greek dolos "ruse, snare." Related: Sedulously; sedulousness.

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peradventure (adv.)

"perhaps, possibly, maybe," Middle English peraventure,paraventure (late 14c.), per auenture (c. 1300), from Old French par aventure (see per + adventure (n.)). Refashioned 17c. as though from Latin.

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pertussis (n.)

"whooping cough," 1670s (Sydenham), from Modern Latin pertussis, from per- "thoroughly," or here perhaps with intensive force (see per), + tussis "cough," a word of unknown origin.

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paramount (adj.)

"supreme, superior in power or jurisdiction," 1530s, from Anglo-French paramont, Old French paramont "above" (in place, order, degree), mid-14c., from Old French par "by," from Latin per "through, for, by" (see per (prep.)) + amont "up," from a mont "upward" (see amount (v.)). The word is equivalent to the Latin phrase per ad montem, literally "to the hill." Related: Paramountcy.

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mph 
also m.p.h., abbreviation of miles per hour, attested from 1887.
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seclude (v.)

mid-15c., secluden, transitive, "to cut off from, shut or keep out" (implied in ben secluded), a sense now archaic, from Latin secludere "shut off, confine," from se- "apart" (see se-) + -cludere, variant of claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). The meaning "remove or guard from public view" is recorded from 1620s. Related: Secluded; secluding.

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pellucid (adj.)

"transparent, translucent, admitting the passage of light," 1610s, from Latin pellucidus "transparent," from pellucere "shine through," from per- "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + lucere "to shine" (from suffixed form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness"). Related: Pellucidly; pellucidity.

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