Etymology
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pasteboard (n.)

kind of thick paper, 1540s, from paste (n.) + board (n.1). So called because it originally was made of several single sheets of paper pasted together.

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pastoralism (n.)

"pastoral character, that which has or suggests idealized rural qualities," by 1809, from pastoral + -ism.

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pastern (n.)

late 13c., pastron, "shackle fixed on the foot of a horse or other beast," from Old French pasturon (Modern French paturon), diminutive of pasture "shackle for a horse in pasture," from Vulgar Latin *pastoria, noun use of fem. of Latin pastorius "of herdsmen," from pastor "shepherd" (see pastor). Metathesis of -r- and the following vowel occurred 1500s. The original sense is obsolete; the meaning was extended by 1520s to the part of the horse's leg between the fetlock and the hoof, to which the tether was attached.

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pastoral (adj.)

early 15c., "of or pertaining to shepherds or the life of a shepherd," from Old French pastoral (13c.) and directly from Latin pastoralis "of herdsmen, of shepherds," from pastor "shepherd" (see pastor (n.)). Meaning "of or pertaining to a Christian pastor or his office" is from 1520s. The noun sense of "poem treating of or descriptive of country life generally," usually in an idealized form and emphasizing its purity and happiness, in which the characters are shepherds or shepherdesses, is from 1580s.

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pasteurization (n.)

the preserving of wines, etc., by destroying fungi and spores by heating to at least 140 degrees Fahrenheit, 1885, from pasteurize + noun ending -ation.

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pastel (n.)

1660s, "crayons, chalk-like pigment used in crayons," from French pastel "crayon," from Italian pastello "a pastel," literally "material reduced to a paste," probably from Late Latin pastellus, diminutive of pasta "dough, paste" (see pasta). The word was applied to pale or light colors (like that of pastels) by 1899. As an adjective from 1884.

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pasteurize (v.)

"to perform pasteurization, sterilize by heat," 1881, with -ize, after Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French chemist and bacteriologist, who invented the process of heating food, milk, wine, etc., to kill most of the micro-organisms in it; distinguished from sterilization, which involves killing all of them. The surname is literally "Pastor." Related: Pasteurized; pasteurizing.

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pastime (n.)

"amusement, diversion, that which serves to make the time pass agreeably," late 15c., passe tyme "recreation, diversion, amusement, sport," from pass (v.) + time (n.). Formed on model of French passe-temps (15c.), from passe, imperative of passer "to pass" + temps "time," from Latin tempus (see temporal).

The central idea of a pastime is that it is so positively agreeable that it lets time slip by unnoticed: as, to turn work into pastime. Amusement has the double meaning of being kept from ennui and of finding occasion of mirth .... Recreation is that sort of play or agreeable occupation which refreshes the tired person, making him as good as new. Diversion is a stronger word than recreation, representing that which turns one aside from ordinary serious work or thought, and amuses him greatly. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
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pasty (n.)

c. 1300, "a type of meat pie, a pie covered with paste or pie crust," especially one of venison or other seasoned meat, from Old French paste "dough, pastry," from Vulgar Latin *pastata "meat wrapped in pastry" from Latin pasta "dough, paste" (see pasta).

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pastoralist (n.)

"a writer of pastorals," 1793, from pastoral + -ist. Perhaps modeled on earlier German Pastoralist.

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