Etymology
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noumenon (n.)

"that which can be the object only of a purely intellectual intuition" (opposed to a phenomenon), 1796, a term introduced by Kant, from Greek noumenon "that which is perceived," neuter passive present participle of noein "to apprehend, perceive by the mind" (from noos "mind," which is of uncertain origin). With passive suffix -menos.

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converse (v.)

mid-14c., "to move about, live, dwell; live or behave in a certain way" (senses now obsolete), from Old French and French converser "to talk, open communication between," also "to live, dwell, inhabit, reside" (12c.), and directly from Latin conversari "to live, dwell, live with, keep company with," passive voice of conversare, literally "to turn round with," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + versare, frequentative of vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").

Sense of "to communicate (with)" in English is from 1590s; that of "talk informally with another" is from 1610s. Related: Conversed; conversing.

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-phone 

word-forming element meaning "voice, sound," also "speaker of," from Greek phōnē "voice, sound" of a human or animal, also "tone, voice, pronunciation, speech," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, say, tell" (source also of Latin for, fari "to speak," fama "talk, report").

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castrato (n.)

"male person emasculated during childhood to prevent the change of voice at puberty, artificial male soprano," 1763, from Italian castrato, from Latin castratus (see castration). "The voice of such a person, after arriving at adult age, combines the high range and sweetness of the female with the power of the male voice" [Century Dictionary].

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effortless (adj.)
1752, "passive, making no effort," from effort + -less. Meaning "easy, requiring no effort" is from 1810. Related: Effortlessly; effortlessness.
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pipes (n.)
"voice," 1580s, from pipe (n.1).
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-pathic 
word-forming element from Latin pathicus, from Greek pathikos "suffering, remaining passive," from pathein "to suffer" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer").
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aphonia (n.)

in pathology, "want of voice, loss of voice through some physical condition," 1778, from medical Latin aphonia, from Greek aphonia "speechlessness," abstract noun from aphonos "voiceless," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + phōnē "voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say") + abstract noun ending (see -ia). The Englished form aphony is attested from 1680s.

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phonogram (n.)

1845, "a written symbol or graphic character representing the sound of the human voice," from phono- "sound, voice" + -gram "a writing, recording." From 1879 as "a sound recording produced by a phonograph." Related: Phonogramic.

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sotto voce 

1737, Italian, literally "under voice," from sotto, from Latin subtus "below" (source also of French sous; see sub-) + voce, from Latin vocem (nominative vox) "voice, sound, utterance" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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