Etymology
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ferment (n.)

early 15c., from Old French ferment (14c.), from Latin fermentum "leaven, yeast; drink made of fermented barley;" figuratively "anger, passion" (see ferment (v.)). Figurative sense of "anger, passion, commotion" in English is from 1670s.

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fervor (n.)
mid-14c., "warmth or glow of feeling," from Old French fervor "heat; enthusiasm, ardor, passion" (12c., Modern French ferveur), from Latin fervor "a boiling, violent heat; passion, ardor, fury," from fervere "to boil; be hot" (from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn").
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impassioned (adj.)
"expressive of strong feeling, filled with passion," c. 1600, past-participle adjective from impassion.
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anthomania (n.)

"extravagant passion for flowers," 1775, from Greek anthos "flower" (see anther) + mania. Related: Anthomaniac.

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coldly (adv.)

mid-13c., "without heat, exposed to cold," from cold (adj.) + -ly (2). From 1520s as "without passion or emotion."

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amative (adj.)
1630s, "disposed to love or sexual passion," from Latin amat-, past participle stem of amare "to love" (see Amy) + -ive. Related: Amativeness.
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moodiness (n.)

Old English modignes "pride, passion, anger;" see moody + -ness. Meaning "condition of being subject to gloomy spells, peevishness, sullenness" is from 1858.

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estrus (n.)
1850, "frenzied passion," from Latin oestrus "frenzy, gadfly," from Greek oistros "gadfly; breeze; sting; anything which makes one mad, mad impulse," perhaps from a PIE *eis- (1), forming words denoting passion (see ire). First attested 1890 with specific meaning "rut in animals, sexual heat." Earliest use in English (1690s) was for "a gadfly." Related: Estrous (1900).
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flame (n.)

Middle English flaume, also flaumbe, flambe, flame, flamme, mid-14c., "a flame;" late 14c., "a flaming mass, a fire; fire in general, fire as an element;" also figurative, in reference to the "heat" or "fire" of emotions, from Anglo-French flaume, flaumbe "a flame" (Old French flambe, 10c.), from Latin flammula "small flame," diminutive of flamma "flame, blazing fire," from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn."

The meaning "a sweetheart, object of one's passion" is attested from 1640s; the figurative sense of "burning passion" was in Middle English, and the nouns in Old French and Latin also meant "fire of love, flame of passion," and, in Latin "beloved object." The Australian flame-tree is from 1857, so called for its red flowers.

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infatuate (v.)

1530s, "turn (something) to foolishness, frustrate by making foolish," from Latin infatuatus, past participle of infatuare "make a fool of," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + fatuus "foolish" (see fatuous). Specific sense of "inspire (in someone) a foolish passion beyond control of reason" is from 1620s. Related: Infatuated; infatuating.

An infatuated person is so possessed by a misleading idea or passion that his thoughts and conduct are controlled by it and turned into folly. [Century Dictionary]
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