Etymology
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partaker (n.)

"one who takes or has a part or share in common with others," c. 1400, part-taker, "a sharer, a participant," from part (n.) + agent noun from take (v.); see partake.

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secluded (adj.)

c. 1600, of persons, "separated from others, withdrawn from public observation;" 1798, in reference to places, "remote or screened from visibility or access;" past-participle adjective from seclude (v.). Earlier secluse (1590s).

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picket (v.)

1745, "to enclose or fortify with pointed stakes," from picket (n.). Meaning "to place or post as a guard of observation" is by 1775. The sense in labor strikes, protests, etc., is attested from 1867. Related: Picketed; picketing.

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memoirs (n.)

"personal record of events, narrative of the facts or events of the life of a person or a phase of history written from personal knowledge or observation upon points about which the writer is specially informed," 1650s, plural of memoir.

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experience (n.)
Origin and meaning of experience

late 14c., "observation as the source of knowledge; actual observation; an event which has affected one," from Old French esperience "experiment, proof, experience" (13c.), from Latin experientia "a trial, proof, experiment; knowledge gained by repeated trials," from experientem (nominative experiens) "experienced, enterprising, active, industrious," present participle of experiri "to try, test," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + peritus "experienced, tested," from PIE *per-yo-, suffixed form of root *per- (3) "to try, risk." Meaning "state of having done something and gotten handy at it" is from late 15c.

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inobservant (adj.)

"not taking notice, not quick or keen in observation, unobservant," 1660s, from Late Latin inobservantem (nominative inobservans) "inattentive, negligent," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin observans (see observance). Related: Inobservance (1610s).

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coign (n.)

also coigne, an archaic spelling of quoin (q.v.) the survival of which is due to Shakespeare's coign of vantage ("Macbeth" I.vi.), popularized by Sir Walter Scott; in this phrase it is properly "a projecting corner" (for observation).

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partake (v.)

1560s, "to take or have a part, portion, or share in common with others," back-formation from Middle English part-taking "a sharing" (late 14c.), or part-taker "a sharer" (c. 1400), both translations of Latin particeps "participant" (n.), also "sharing, partaking" (see participation). Meaning "to share in some degree the nature, character, or peculiarities of" is from 1610s. Related: Partook; partaking.

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observative (adj.)

"of or pertaining to observation," 1610s, from Latin observat-, past-participle stem of observare "watch over, note, heed, look to, attend to, guard, regard, comply with" (see observe) + -ive.

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seismograph (n.)

"instrument for measuring the motions of an earthquake," 1858, from seismo- + -graph. Based on Italian sismografo, coined and invented by Luigi Palmieri (1807-1896), director of meteorological observation on Mount Vesuvius. Related: Seismographic; seismographer; seismography (1865).

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