Etymology
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depict (v.)

early 15c., "portray, paint, form a likeness of in color," from Latin depictus, past participle of depingere "to portray, paint, sketch; describe, imagine," from de "down" (see de-) + pingere "to paint" (see paint (v.)). Extended sense of "portray in words, describe" is from mid-15c. Related: Depicted; depicting.

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pinto (n.)

"a horse marked black and white, a painted pony," 1860, from American Spanish pinto (adj.) "piebald," literally "painted, spotted," from Spanish, from Vulgar Latin *pinctus, variant of Latin pictus "painted," past participle of pingere "to paint" (see paint (v.)). The pinto bean (1916), is so called for its markings.

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depiction (n.)

"act of portraying; a portrayal, a likeness," 1680s, from French depiction, from Late Latin depictionem (nominative depictio) "painting, description," noun of action from Latin depictus, past participle of depingere "to portray, paint, sketch; describe, imagine," from de "down" (see de-) + pingere "to paint" (see paint (v.)).

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pictorial (adj.)

1640s, "of or pertaining to pictures or the making of them," with -al (1) + Latin pictorius "of a painter," from pictor "painter," from past participle stem of pingere "to make pictures" (see paint (v.)). Meaning "expressed or depicted in pictures" is from 1807; the sense of "illustrated by or containing pictures" is by 1826. The noun meaning "journal in which pictures are the main feature" is attested by 1844. Related: Pictorially.

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pint (n.)

mid-14c., "liquid measure equal to half a quart;" also "a vessel holding a pint," from Old French pinte "liquid measure, pint" (13c.), probably from Vulgar Latin *pincta (source of Old Provençal, Spanish, Italian pinta,Dutch, German pint), altered from Latin picta "painted," fem. past participle of pingere "to paint" (see paint (v.)), on notion of a painted mark on a vessel indicating this measure. Used elliptically for "pint of ale" (or beer) from 1742. Pint-sized "small" (especially in reference to children) is recorded by 1930; the literal sense is older.

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pigment (n.)

late 14c., "a red dye," from Latin pigmentum "coloring matter, pigment, paint," figuratively "ornament," from stem of pingere "to color, paint" (see paint (v.)). By 1610s in the broader sense "any substance that is or can be used by painters to impart color" (technically a dry substance that can be powdered and mixed with a liquid medium).

Variants of this word could have been known in Old English and Middle English (compare 12c. pyhmentum, laterpiment) with a sense of "a spiced drink, a remedy or concoction containing spices," based on a secondary sense of the Latin word in Medieval Latin. As a verb from 1900. Related: Pigmented. Also pigmental"of or pertaining to pigment" (1836); pigmentary (1835).

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*peig- 

also *peik-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to cut, mark by incision," hence "embroider, paint."

It forms all or part of: depict; file (n.2) "metal tool for abrading or smoothing;" paint; pictogram; pictograph; pictorial; picture; picturesque; pigment; pimento; pint; pinto.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit pimsati "to carve, hew out, cut to measure, adorn;" Greek pikros "bitter, sharp, pointed, piercing, painful," poikilos "spotted, pied, various;" Latin pingere "to embroider, tattoo, paint, picture;" Old Church Slavonic pila "file, saw," pegu "variegated," pisati "to write;" Lithuanian piela "file," piešiu, piešti "to write;" Old High German fehjan "to adorn."

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picture (n.)

early 15c., pictur, pictoure, pittour, pectur, "the process or art of drawing or painting," a sense now obsolete; also "a visual or graphic representation of a person, scene, object, etc.," from Latin pictura "painting," from pictus, past participle of pingere "to make pictures, to paint, to embroider," (see paint (v.)).

Picture window is from 1938. Picture post-card is recorded from 1899. Picture-book, "book illustrated with pictures or consisting mostly of pictures," especially one for children, is by 1847. Picture-frame "more or less ornamental border put around a picture to protect it" is from 1660s.

The phrase every picture tells a story is attested from 1900, in advertisements for an illustrated life of Christ. To be in (or out of) the picture in the figurative sense dates to 1900.

The expression a picture is worth a thousand words, attested from 1918, probably originated in the publication trade (the notion that a picture was worth 1,000 words is in printers' publications by 1911). The phrase was used in the form worth a million words by American newspaper editor Arthur Brisbane (1864-1936) in an editorial much-read c. 1916 titled "What is a Good Newspaper" in the "New York Evening Journal." In part it read: "After news and humor come good pictures. In this day of hurry we learn through the eye, and one picture may be worth a million words."

The phrase seems to have emerged into general use via the medium of advertising (which scaled down the number and also gave the expression its spurious origin story as "a Japanese proverb" or some such thing, by 1919). Earlier various acts or deeds (and in one case "the arrow") were said to be worth a thousand words.

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face-painting (n.)
1706, "portrait-painting," from face (n.) + painting (n.). In reference to applying color to the face, by 1778. Related: Face-painter; face-paint.
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portray (v.)

mid-13c., portraien, "to draw, paint" (something), from Anglo-French purtraire, Old French portraire "to draw, to paint, portray" (12c.), literally "trace, draw forth," from por- "forth" (from Latin pro-; see pro-) + traire "trace, draw," from Latin trahere "to drag, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Meaning "depict in words, describe" is from late 14c. Related: Portrayed; portrayer; portraying.

Latin protrahere was "to draw forth" but in Medieval Latin also "to draw, paint."

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