Etymology
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rat-catcher (n.)

"one whose business is the catching of rats, a ratter," 1590s, from rat (n.) + catcher.

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rat fink (n.)
also ratfink, 1963, teen slang, see rat (n.) + fink (n.). Popularized by, and perhaps coined by, U.S. custom car builder Ed "Big Daddy" Roth (1932-2001), who made a hot-rod comic character of it, supposedly to lampoon Mickey Mouse.
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rat-tail (n.)

also rat's-tail, from rat (n.) + tail (n.1). Used since 16c. of conditions, growths, or devices held to resemble a rat's long, hairless tail in any way, including "lank lock of hair" (1810); "end of a rope" (1867). Related: Rat-tailed. A rat-tail file (1744) is a fine, round file used for enlarging holes in metal.

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rat-snake (n.)

"snake which kills rats," 1818, from rat (n.) + snake (n.).

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rat-hole (n.)

also rathole, "the hole gnawed in woodwork, etc., by a rat or rats," 1812 first in the figurative sense of "nasty, messy place;" from rat (n.) + hole (n.). As "bottomless hole" (especially one where money goes) by 1921.

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rat-trap (n.)

"trap for catching rats," late 15c., rat trappe, from rat (n.) + trap (n.).

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rat-poison (n.)

"something used to poison rats with," especially arsenic, 1799, from rat (n.) + poison (n.).

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brat (n.)
c. 1500, "beggar's child" ("... wyle beggar with thy brattis ...), originally slang, from a northern, Midlands and western England dialect word for "makeshift or ragged garment;" probably the same word as Old English bratt "cloak," which is from a Celtic source (compare Old Irish bratt "cloak, cloth"). The transferred meaning is perhaps from notion of "child's apron." Hollywood Brat Pack (modeled on 1950s Rat Pack) is from 1985. Brattery "nursery" is attested from 1788.
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rugrat (n.)

also rug-rat, "baby, small child," by 1968; see rug + rat (n.).

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ratty (adj.)

1856, "resembling a rat;" 1865, "full of rats;" 1867, "wretched, miserable, shabby," from rat (n.) + -y (2). An older word for "resembling a rat" is rattish (1680s).

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