Etymology
Advertisement
overtower (v.)

"tower or soar too high," 1830, from over- + tower (v.). Related: Overtowered; overtowering.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
overtop (v.)

"rise above or beyond the top of," 1560s, from over- + top (v.). Related: Overtopped; overtopping.

Related entries & more 
overtax (v.)

1640s, "to demand too much of," from over- + tax (v.). Meaning "to levy taxes beyond what is equitable or reasonable, to tax heavily or excessively" is by 1823. Related: Overtaxed; overtaxing.

Related entries & more 
overtone (n.)

1867, in music, "a harmonic, an upper partial tone," from over- + tone (n.); a loan-translation of German Oberton, which was first used by German physicist Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821-1894) as a contraction of Overpartialton "upper partial tone." Figurative sense of "subtle implication" is from 1890, in William James.

Related entries & more 
overturn (v.)

early 13c., of a wheel, "to rotate, roll over," from over- + turn (v.). Attested from c. 1300 in general transitive sense "to throw over violently;" figurative meaning "to ruin, destroy" is from late 14c. Of judicial decisions, "to reverse," it is attested from 1826. Related: Overturned; overturning. Old English had oferweorpan "to overturn, overthrow."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
overtrouble (v.)

also over-trouble, "to trouble excessively," 1580s, from over- + trouble (v.). Related: Overtroubled; overtroubling.

Related entries & more 
overtire (v.)

1550s, "to tire excessively, fatigue to exhaustion" (trans.), from over- + tire (v.). Intransitive sense of "become excessively fatigued" is by 1630s. Related: Overtired; overtiring.

Related entries & more 
overthrow (v.)

c. 1300, ouerthrouen, "to knock down, throw down, cast headlong," from over- + throw (v.). Figurative sense of "to cast down from power, defeat" is attested from late 14c. Related: Overthrown; overthrowing. Earlier in same senses was Middle English overwerpen "to overturn (something), overthrow; destroy," from Old English oferweorpan (see warp (v.)).

Related entries & more 
overtake (v.)

"to come up to, catch up with, catch in pursuit," early 13c., from over- + take (v.). According to OED, originally "the running down and catching of a fugitive or beast of chase"; the editors find the sense of over- in this word "not so clear." The meaning "take by surprise, come on unexpectedly" (of storms, night, misfortune) is from late 14c. Related: Overtaken; overtaking. Old English had oferniman "to take away, carry off, seize, ravish."

Related entries & more 
overthrow (n.)

mid-15c., overthrou, "destruction, downfall, action of overthrowing," from over- + throw (n.). Meaning "state of being overthrown" is by 1903.

Related entries & more 

Page 2