Etymology
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suborder (n.)
also sub-order, 1807 in biology; 1834 in architecture, from sub- + order (n.). Related: Subordinal.
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disorder (v.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "destroy or derange the order of, throw into confusion," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + order (v.). Replaced earlier disordeine (mid-14c.), from Old French desordainer, from Medieval Latin disordinare "throw into disorder," from Latin dis- + ordinare "to order, regulate," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Disordered; disordering.

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reorder (v.)

also re-order, c. 1600, "to set in order again, arrange anew," from re- + order (v.). From 1810 as "repeat a command." Commercial sense of "place a new order for" (a thing) is from 1810. Related: Reordered; reordering.

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ordinate (v.)

1560s, "ordain, appoint authoritatively" (a sense now obsolete); 1590s, "direct, dispose," from Latin ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Ordinated; ordinating.

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ordinate (adj.)

late 14c., "regular, normal," of behavior, thoughts, etc., "properly directed, proper," from Latin ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Ordinately.

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ordinal (adj.)

c. 1400, "regular, ordinary; well-regulated, proper," from Old French ordinel and directly from Late Latin ordinalis "showing order, denoting an order of succession," from Latin ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, series" (see order (n.)). Meaning "marking the place or position of an object in an order or series" is from 1590s.

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ornate (adj.)

"ornamented, artistically finished, decorated; decorous," c. 1400, from Latin ornatus "fitted out, furnished, supplied; adorned, decorated, embellished," past participle of ornare "adorn, fit out," from stem of ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Earliest reference is to literary style. Related: Ornately; ornateness.

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inordinate (adj.)
late 14c., "not ordered, lacking order or regularity," from Latin inordinatus "unordered, not arranged," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "to set in order" (see order (n.)). Sense of "immoderate, excessive" is from notion of "not kept within orderly limits." Related: Inordinately; inordinateness.
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coordinate (adj.)

1640s, "of the same order, belonging to the same rank or degree," from Medieval Latin coordinatus, past participle of coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Meaning "involving coordination" is from 1769. Related: Coordinance.

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coordinate (v.)

also co-ordinate, 1660s, "to place in the same rank," from Latin coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from co- "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)).

Meaning "to arrange in proper position relative to each other" (transitive) is from 1847; that of "to work together in order" (intransitive) is from 1863. Related: Coordinated; coordinating.

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