Etymology
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adore (v.)

late 14c., aouren, "to worship, pay divine honors to, bow down before," from Old French aorer "to adore, worship, praise" (10c., later adorer), from Latin adorare "speak to formally, beseech, entreat, ask in prayer," in Late Latin "to worship," literally "to call to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ōrare "speak formally, pray" (see orator).

The meaning "to honor very highly" is attested from 1590s; the weakened sense of "to be very fond of" emerged by 1880s. Related: Adored; adoring.

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oracle (n.)

late 14c., "a message from a god expressed by divine inspiration through a priest or priestess," in answer to a human inquiry, usually respecting some future event, from Old French oracle "temple, house of prayer; oracle" (12c.) and directly from Latin oraculum, oraclum "divine announcement, oracle; place where oracles are given," from ōrare "to pray to, plead to, beseech" (see orator), with material instrumental suffix -culo-.

In antiquity, "the agency or medium of a god," also "the place where such divine utterances were given." This last sense is attested in English from early 15c. Extended sense of "uncommonly wise person" is from 1590s.

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rhetor (n.)

late 14c., rethor, "master or teacher of rhetoric," also "an ancient Greek orator," from Old French retor (Modern French rhéteur), from Latin rhetor (in Medieval Latin also rethor), from Greek rhētōr "speaker, master speaker, orator; artist of discourse; teacher of rhetoric" (see rhetoric (n.)). 

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cicerone (n.)

"a local guide to antiquities and curiosities in Italy," 1726, from Italian cicerone, from Latin Ciceronem, from the name of the great Roman orator (see Ciceronian). Traditionally the local guides were so called in reference to their florid loquacity.

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rhetoric (n.)

early 14c., rethorike, "the art of eloquence and persuasiveness in language, the art of using language to influence others," from Old French retorike, rethorique (Modern French rhétorique) and directly from Latin rhetorice, from Greek rhētorikētekhnē  "art of an orator," from rhētōr (genitive rhētoros) "speaker, master speaker, orator; artist of discourse; teacher of rhetoric," especially (in the Attic official language), "orator in public." This is related to rhesis "speech," rhema "word, phrase, verb," literally "that which is spoken" (from PIE *wre-tor-, from root *were- (3) "to speak;" see verb). Since classical times with a derogatory suggestion of "artificial oratory" as opposed to what is natural or unaffected, "ostentatious declamation."

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rhetorician (n.)

early 15c., rethoricien, "writer on the art of rhetoric; professional orator; master of literary eloquence," from Old French rethoricien (Modern French rhétoricien), from rethorique (see rhetoric). An Old English word for one was wordsawere "word-sower."

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apostrophe (n.2)

"a turning aside of an orator in the course of a speech to address briefly some individual," 1530s, from French apostrophe, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos, "turning away," from apostrephein "avert, turn away," from apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Related: Apostrophic; apostrophize.

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soap-box (n.)

also soapbox, 1650s, "box for holding soap," later especially a wooden crate in which soap may be packed; from soap (n.) + box (n.). Typical of a makeshift stand for a public orator at least since 1907. Also used by children to make racing carts, as in soap-box derby, annual race in Dayton, Ohio, which dates to 1933.

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rhetorical (adj.)

mid-15c., rethorical, "eloquent, according to the principles of rhetoric," from rhetoric (n.) or else from Latin rhetoricus (in Medieval Latin rethoricus), from Greek rhētorikos "oratorical, rhetorical; skilled in speaking," from rhētōr "orator."

The meaning "pertaining to rhetoric" is from 1520s. In later use also with implication of artificial extravagance. Rhetorical question, "statement put in the form of a question for rhetorical effect only and thus not requiring an answer," is from 1670s. Related: Rhetorically.

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Ciceronian (adj.)

1660s, "pertaining to or characteristic of Roman statesman and orator Marcus Tullius Cicero" (106-43 B.C.E.), especially of speaking or writing style, "eloquent, copious." He often was known as Tully in early Modern English writers, Cicero being a cognomen of the genus Tullia. The name evidently is related to cicer "chickpea," and may have referred to a facial wart prominent on some ancestor of the family.

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