Etymology
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post-operative (adj.)
also postoperative, "occurring after a surgical operation," 1869, from post- + operative. Short form post-op is attested from 1971.
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carbonization (n.)
"operation of converting wood or other organic substance into coal or charcoal," 1804, from carbon + -ization. Related: Carbonize; carbonized.
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ure (n.)
"effect, operation, practice," early 15c., from Old French uevre (13c., Modern French oeuvre), from Latin opera (see opera).
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pre-op (n.)

1913 as short for pre-operative (preparation). Pre-operative as an adjective, "given or occurring before a surgical operation" is by 1904.

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blepharoplasty (n.)
"surgical operation of making a new eyelid from transplanted skin," 1839, from blepharo-, from Greek blepharon "eyelid" (related to blepein "to look, see") + -plasty.
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operable (adj.)
1640s, "practicable," from operate + -able, or else from Late Latin operabilis. Surgical sense, "capable of treatment by operation," recorded by 1904. Related: Operability.
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slide-rule (n.)
also slide rule, mathematical calculating tool, 1838, from slide (v.) + rule (n.). So called for its method of operation. Earlier sliding-rule (1660s).
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plating (n.)

1825, "the art or operation of covering articles with a thin coating or film of metal;" 1833, "thin coating of one metal laid upon another," verbal noun from plate (v.).

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infrastructure (n.)
1887, from French infrastructure (1875); see infra- + structure (n.). The installations that form the basis for any operation or system. Originally in a military sense.
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automate (v.)
"to convert to automatic operation," 1954, back-formation from automated (q.v.). Ancient Greek verb automatizein meant "to act of oneself, to act unadvisedly." Related: Automating.
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