Etymology
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Seoul 

South Korean capital, from Korean soul, literally "capital." It was the national capital from 1392 until Japanese annexation in 1910.

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coplanar (adj.)

also co-planar, "situated or operating in the same plane," 1849, from co- + planar.

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Beijing 

Chinese capital, from bei "north" + jing "capital" (as opposed to Nanking, literally "southern capital").

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transeunt (adj.)

variant of transient (adj.), usually in a sense of "operating beyond or outside itself" (opposite of immanent).

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capitalize (v.)

"write or print in capital letters," 1764, from capital (n.1) + -ize. The meaning "convert (assets) to capital" is recorded from 1868, from capital (n.2). Related: Capitalized; capitalizing.

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decapitalize (v.)

"reduce from the rank or position of a capital city," 1870; see de- + capital (n.1) + -ize. As "to remove the financial capital from," by 1913, from capital (n.2). In reference to letters, "to change from upper case to lower case," by 1899. Related: Decapitalized; decapitalization.

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Nanking 

city in China, literally "southern capital," from Chinese nan "south" + jing "capital."

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Linux 

computer operating system, named for Linux kernel, written 1991 by software engineer Linus Torvalds (b. 1969) of Finland (who coined the word but did not choose it as the name).

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Concorde (n.)

supersonic passenger airliner operating from 1976 to 2003, from French concorde, literally "harmony, agreement" (see concord (n.)), reflecting the Anglo-French collaborative agreement that produced it.

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Canberra 

capital of Australia, 1826, from Aborigine nganbirra "meeting place."

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