Etymology
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one-way (adj.)

1824, "leading in one direction only;" by 1887 in reference to travel tickets or fares; 1914 in reference to streets; 1940 in reference to windows, mirrors, etc.; from one + way (n.).

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one-horse (adj.)

"small-scale, petty" 1853, American English, colloquial, in reference to towns; see one + horse (n.). Probably from earlier use in reference to a carriage, sleigh, plow, etc., "drawn by a single horse" (1750); also "possessing only one horse" (of a farmer); hence "petty, on a small scale, of limited capacity or resources; inferior."

Shortly afterwards I took a stroll over the town. It was what is generally denominated a "one horse town," and I would think a pretty small pony at that. Two stores, one grocery, a stable, and four dwellings made up the sum of its buildings. ["Daguerreotyping in the Back Woods," in Yankee Notions, March, 1855]
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one-upsmanship (n.)

"act or practice of being 'one up,'" 1952, from noun phrase one up "scoring one more point than one's opponent" (1919) + ending from sportsmanship, etc.

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everyone (n.)

"every person, everybody," c. 1200, from every + one.

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histone (n.)
1885, from German histon (1884); see histo- + -one.
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aldosterone (n.)
isolated 1953, named with -one + combining forms of aldehyde and sterol.
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oneself 

1540s, one's self, "a person's self" (without distinction of gender), an emphatic form of one, with self. Hyphenated 18c.; written as one word from c. 1827, on model of himself, herself, myself, itself, etc.

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oneness (n.)

1590s, "quality of being just one, unity, union;" 1610s, "sameness, uniformity," from one + -ness. The modern word appears to be a re-formation; Middle English onnesse (Old English annes "unity, agreement, solitude") vanished after 1400.

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silicone (n.)
coined 1863 in German from silico-, combining form indicating the presence of silicon, + -one.
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someone (pron.)
c. 1300, sum on; from some + one. Someone else "romantic rival" is from 1914.
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