Etymology
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osmium (n.)

metallic element of the platinum group, 1803, coined in Modern Latin by its discoverer, English chemist Smithson Tennant (1761-1815) from Greek osmē "smell, scent, odor" good or bad, from PIE root *hed- "to smell" (see odor). With metallic element ending -ium. So called for the pungent smell of its oxide, a highly poisonous acid. The densest stable element, it commonly is found in alloy with iridium. Related: Osmic; osmious.

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redolent (adj.)

c. 1400, of flowers, food, etc., "having or diffusing a fresh and sweet scent," from Old French redolent "emitting an odor" and directly from Latin redolentem (nominative redolens), present participle of redolere "emit a scent, diffuse odor," from red-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + olere "give off a smell" (see odor). The meaning "odorous or smelling" of (or with) something is by 1700; figurative use of this is by 1828. Related: Redolently.

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acrylic (adj.)
1843, "of or containing acryl," the name of a radical derived from acrolein (1843), the name of a liquid in onions and garlic that makes eyes tear, from Latin acer "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce") + olere "to smell" (see odor) + -in (see -ine (2)). With adjectival suffix -ic. Modern senses often short for acrylic fiber, acrylic resin, etc.
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lachrymose (adj.)
also lacrymose, 1660s, "tear-like," from Latin lacrimosus "tearful, sorrowful, weeping," also "causing tears, lamentable," from lacrima, lacryma "a tear," a dialect-altered borrowing of Greek dakryma "a tear," from dakryein "to shed tears, weep, lament with tears," from dakry "a tear" (from PIE *dakru- "tear;" see tear (n.1)). Meaning "given to tears, tearful" is first attested 1727; meaning "of a mournful character" is from 1822. Related: Lachrymosely.

The -d- to -l- alteration in Latin is the so-called "Sabine -L-"; compare Latin olere "smell," from root of odor, and Ulixes, the Latin form of Greek Odysseus. The Medieval Latin practice of writing -ch- for -c- before Latin -r- also altered anchor, pulchritude, sepulchre. The -y- is pedantic, from the former belief that the word was pure Greek. Earlier in the same sense was lachrymental (1620s). Middle English had lacrymable "tearful" (mid-15c.).
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flair (n.)

mid-14c., "an odor," from Old French flaire "odor or scent," especially in hunting, "fragrance, sense of smell," from flairier "to give off an odor; stink; smell sweetly" (Modern French flairer), from Vulgar Latin *flagrare, a dissimilation of Latin fragrare "emit (a sweet) odor" (see fragrant). Sense of "special aptitude" is American English, 1925, probably from hunting and the notion of a hound's ability to track scent.

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musky (adj.)

"having the characteristic odor of musk," c. 1600, from musk + -y (2). Related: Muskiness.

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aroma (n.)
early 13c., "fragrant substance, spice" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin aroma "sweet odor," from Greek aroma "seasoning, a spice or sweet herb," which is of unknown origin. Meaning "fragrance, odor," especially an agreeable one, is from 1814. A hypercorrect plural is aromata. Related: Aromal.
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malodorous (adj.)

"having a bad or offensive odor," 1832, from mal- "bad" + odorous. Related: Malodorously; malodorousness.

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stink (n.)

mid-13c., "strong offensive odor," from stink (v.). Sense of "extensive fuss" is attested by 1812.

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mundungus (n.)
"tobacco with an offensive odor," 1640s, from Spanish mondongo "paunch, tripe, intestines," related to modejo "paunch, belly (of a pig)."
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