Etymology
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retiree (n.)

"one who has retired from a business or occupation," 1945, from retire + -ee. The older word was retirer (16c.) "one who retires or withdraws."

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silversmith (n.)

"maker of silverware, one whose occupation is working in silver," Old English seolforsmiþ; see silver (n.) + smith (n.).

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chimney-sweep (n.)

"one whose occupation is the clearing of soot from chimneys," 1727, from their cry (attested from 1610s); see chimney + sweep (v.). The earlier noun was chimney-sweeper (c. 1500).

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goatherd (n.)

"one whose occupation is the care of goats," early 13c. (as a surname), from or replacing Old English gat-hyrde (West Saxon); see goat + herd (n.).

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masonry (n.)

mid-14c., masonrie, "stonework, a construction of dressed or fitted stones;" late 14c., "art or occupation of a mason;" from Old French maçonerie (14c.), from maçon (see mason).

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dyer (n.)

"one whose occupation is to dye cloths, skins, etc.," mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from dye (v.).

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robbery (n.)

c. 1200, robberie, "the act, practice, or occupation of stealing or plundering," from Old French roberie "robbery, theft," from rober "to rob" (see rob).

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distiller (n.)

1570s, "one who or that which distills," agent noun from distill. Especially "one whose occupation is to extract spirits by distillation" (1630s).

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builder (n.)

"one who builds, one whose occupation is a builder," especially one who directs works of construction, late 13c., agent noun from build (v.).

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disengagement (n.)

1640s, "act or process of setting free; state of being disengaged," from French désengagement, from desengager (see disengage). By 1701 as "freedom from engrossing occupation, leisure."

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