Etymology
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-scope 
word-forming element indicating "an instrument for seeing," from Late Latin -scopium, from Greek -skopion, from skopein "to look at, examine" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe").
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scrutinize (v.)

"observe or investigate closely," 1670s, from scrutiny + -ize. Related: Scrutinized; scrutinizing. The earlier verb was scrutine (1590s), from French scrutine, from Late Latin scrutinium.

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feeler (n.)
early 15c., "one who feels," agent noun from feel (v.). Of animal organs, 1660s. Transferred sense of "proposal put forth to observe the reaction it gets" is from 1830. Related: Feelers.
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-scopy 
word-forming element meaning "viewing, examining, observing," from Modern Latin -scopium, from Greek -skopion, from skopein "to look at, examine" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe").
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contemplate (v.)

1590s, "reflect upon, ponder, study, view mentally, meditate," from Latin contemplatus, past participle of contemplari "to gaze attentively, observe; consider, contemplate," originally "to mark out a space for observation" (as an augur does), from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + templum "area for the taking of auguries" (see temple (n.1)).

From c. 1600 as "to view or observe with continued attention." From 1816 as "to intend, have in view as a future act." Related: Contemplated; contemplating.

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inspection (n.)

late 14c., from Old French inspeccion "inspection, examination" (13c., Modern French inspection), from Latin inspectionem (nominative inspectio) "a looking into," noun of action from past participle stem of inspicere "look at, observe, view; look into, inspect, examine," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Old English used onbesceawung as a loan-translation of Latin inspectio. Related: Inspectional.

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retrospect (n.)

c. 1600, "a regard or reference" (to something), from Latin retrospectum, past participle of retrospicere "look back," from retro "back" (see retro-) + specere "look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Meaning "survey of past events" is from 1660s.

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inspector (n.)
c. 1600, "overseer, superintendent," from Latin inspector "one who views or observes," agent noun from past participle stem of inspicere "look at, observe, view; look into, inspect, examine," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). As a police ranking between sergeant and superintendent, it dates from 1840. Related: Inspectorial (1752). Of the 18c. feminine formations, inspectrix (1703) is earlier than inspectress (1737).
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regard (v.)

mid-14c., regarden, "consider" (that something is so or a certain way), from Old French regarder "to look at, take notice of," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix, + garder "look, heed," from a Germanic language (see guard (n.)).

Sense of "consider of importance or interest" is from 1510s. Meaning "look upon, observe" is from 1520s, as is that of "observe a certain respect toward." From 1610s as "look upon" (with a certain feeling), "have or show a certain feeling for." Related: Regarded; regarding.

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witness (v.)
c. 1300, "bear testimony," from witness (n.). Meaning "affix one's signature to (a document) to establish its identity" is from early 14c. Meaning "see or know by personal presence, observe" is from 1580s. Related: Witnessed; witnessing.
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