Etymology
Advertisement
expensive (adj.)

1620s, "given to profuse expenditure," from expense (n.) + -ive. Meaning "costly, requiring profuse expenditure" is from 1630s. Earlier was expenseful (c. 1600). Expenseless was in use mid-17c.-18c., but there seems now nothing notable to which it applies, and the dictionaries label it "obsolete." Related: Expensively; expensiveness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
butte (n.)

"conspicuous elevation," especially a steep-sided one notable in its isolation, 1805, American English, from French butte, from Old French but "mound, knoll; target to shoot at" (see butt (n.3)). A relic of the French exploration of the upper Missouri region, introduced in English in Lewis & Clark's journals.

Related entries & more 
Queen Anne 

by 1863 in reference an architectural and design style (notable for commodious and dignified buildings) characteristic of the time of Queen Anne of Great Britain and Ireland, who reigned 1702-14. An imitation of it had a vogue in U.S., especially for suburban cottages, from c. 1878. The Queen Anne's lace of the white, feathery blossoms is so called by 1893 in American English.

Related entries & more 
simile (n.)

"a comparison of two things in rhetoric or poetry," late 14c., from Latin simile "a like thing; a comparison, likeness, parallel," neuter of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). They must have notable points in common, both things must be mentioned, and the comparison should be directly stated. Further, to Johnson, "A simile, to be perfect, must both illustrate and ennoble the subject."

Related entries & more 
gazpacho (n.)

type of Spanish vegetable soup notable for being served cold, by 1742 in translations of "Don Quixote;" from 1590s as a Spanish word in Spanish-English dictionaries. According to Ayto ("Diner's Dictionary") the name is of Arabic origin and means literally "soaked bread." Perhaps in reference to the garlic croutons that traditionally are served with it.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
F.M. 

1922, abbreviation of frequency modulation as a method of encoding information in radio waves by varying the frequency of the wave. As a method of broadcasting radio programs, it began in the late 1930s and was notable for superior noise reduction and the capability of broadcasting in stereo. As the chosen medium for broadcasting stereo rock music it became popular in the 1970s.

Related entries & more 
memorabilia (n.)

"things worth remembering," 1792, from Latin memorabilia "notable achievements," noun use of neuter plural of memorabilis "worthy of being remembered" (see memorable). The use of the word in English probably was suggested by Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates. Originally of writings; by 1922 it was being used in reference to objects and relics that serve to recall something to the memory, things associated with some person, place, or event.

Related entries & more 
pedestrian (n.)

1793, "a walker, one who walks or journeys on foot," from pedestrian (adj.). In early use especially "one who walks or races on foot for a wager; a professional walker; one who has made a notable record for speed or endurance." In 20c. it came to mean especially "person walking on a road or pavement" as opposed to person driving or riding in a motor vehicle.

Related entries & more 
shrike (n.)

"predatory oscine passerine bird notable for its long, toothed bill," 1540s, apparently from a survival of Old English scric "a shrike or thrush," literally "bird with a shrill call," probably echoic of its cry and related to shriek (compare Old Norse skrikja "shrieker, shrike," German schrik "moor hen," Swedish skrika "jay"), which in Middle English also was used of bird cries.

Related entries & more 
Phoebe 

fem. proper name, originally (late 14c.), a name of Artemis as the goddess of the moon, also the moon itself (mid-15c.); from Latin Phoebe, from Greek Phoebē, from phoibos "bright, pure," a word of unknown origin. The fem. form of Phoebus, an epithet of Apollo as sun-god. Phoebe, a notable figure in the early Church, is mentioned in Romans 16:1-2. Most popular as a given name for girls born in the U.S. in the 1880s and 2010s.

Related entries & more 

Page 2