Etymology
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red-nosed (adj.)

c. 1600, typically in reference to drunkenness, from red (adj.1) + nose (n.). Red-nose (adj.) indicating "drunken" is by 1580s.

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nosegay (n.)

"bunch of flowers used to delight the sense of smell," late 15c., from nose (n.) + gay in an obsolete noun sense of "gay or bright thing."

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naso- 

word-forming element meaning "relating to the nose; of the nose and," from Latin nasus "nose," from PIE *nas- (see nose (n.)).

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nozzle (n.)

mid-15c., noselle "socket on a candlestick," diminutive of nose (n.); with -el (3). Meaning "small spout" is attested by 1680s.

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pug-nose (n.)

"a nose turned upwards at the tip," 1778, from pug (n.) based on fancied similarity to the nose of either the monkey or the dog. Related: Pug-nosed (1791). Pug-face is attested by 1768.

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hard-nosed (adj.)
"stubborn," 1927, from hard (adj.) + nose (n.). Earlier of bullets or shells with hard tips, and of dogs that had difficulty following a scent. Not in common use before 1950s, when it begins to be applied to tough or relentless characters generally (Damon Runyon characters, U.S. Marines, Princeton professors, etc.). Soft-nosed seems to have been used only of bullets.
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nuzzle (v.)

early 15c., "to bring the nose to the ground," back-formation from noselyng "face-downward, on the nose, in a prostrate position" (c. 1400), frequentative of nose (v.). The meaning "burrow with the nose, thrust the nose into" is attested from 1520s; that of "lie snug" is from 1590s, influenced by nestle, or by nursle, frequentative of nurse (v.). Related: Nuzzled; nuzzling.

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nosy (adj.)

also nosey, 1610s, "having a prominent nose," from nose (n.) + -y (2). Earlier in this sense was nasee (mid-14c.), from Anglo-French, from Old French nasé, ultimately from Latin nasus "nose." Sense of "inquisitive" is recorded from 1882. Nosey Parker as a name for an inquisitive person is by 1890.

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*nas- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "nose."

It forms all or part of: nares; nark; nasal; nasopharynx; nasturtium; ness; nose; nostril; nozzle; nuzzle; pince-nez.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit nasa, Old Persian naham, Latin nasus, Old Church Slavonic nasu, Lithuanian nosis, Old English nosu, German Nase "nose."
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pince-nez (n.)

folding eyeglasses kept in place on the nose by a spring-clip, by 1853, French, literally "pinch-nose," from pincer "to pinch" (see pinch (v.)) + nez "nose" (from Latin nasus, from PIE root *nas- "nose").

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