Etymology
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normality (n.)

"character or state of being in accordance with rule or standard," 1833, from normal + -ity.

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demented (adj.)

"having lost the normal use of reason, afflicted with dementia," 1640s, from obsolete dement "drive mad." Related: Dementedness.

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outsized (adj.)

"larger than average," 1880, from out- + size. As a noun, "a person or thing larger than normal," 1845.

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normative (adj.)

"establishing or setting up a norm or standard which ought to be followed," 1880, perhaps from French normatif, from Latin norma "rule" (see normal).

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normally (adv.)

1590s, "regularly, according to general custom" (a sense now archaic or obsolete), from normal + -ly (2). Meaning "under ordinary conditions" is by 1838.

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math (n.1)

American English shortening of mathematics, 1890; the British preference, maths, is attested from 1911. "Math. is used as an abbreviation in written English in the U.K. but not in speech, the normal form being Maths" [OED].

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clean-living (adj.)

"of upright character and healthful habits, mentally and morally healthy," 1874, from the noun phrase; see clean (adj.) + living (n.).

Clean Living is opposed to anything and everything which speaks for physical and mental disorder, dirt, disease, distress and discontent. Clean Living stands for babies, better born and better bred, better clothed and better fed; happier, healthier babies with normal play, normal environment and a normal chance to live and develop. Clean Living stands for youth, the critical time, the unfolding time, the time when muscle, mind, morals and manners of the boy and girl shall start right or wrong, for health and success or disease and failure. [Clean Living, vol. I, no. 1, April 1916, Chicago]
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normalization (n.)

"act or process of making normal," 1842, from normalize + -ation. International political sense "achieving of stable relations between two countries" is recorded by 1938.

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sack (n.4)

"sherry," 1530s, an alteration of French (vin) sec "dry (wine)," from Latin siccus "dry" (see siccative). Originally of strong, light-colored wine from Spain and the Canaries. OED notes that the vowel is "not a normal development from the original 'seck.' "

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extra-curricular (adj.)

also extracurricular, in reference to education, "pursued in addition to the normal course of study," 1911, from extra- + curricular. As a noun, "an extra-curricular course or activity," by 1957.

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