Etymology
Advertisement
blithering (adj.)

1880, present-participle adjective (from the first typically with idiot) from blither (v.) "to talk nonsense." From 1872 as a verbal noun.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
blither (v.)

1868, variant of blether "talk nonsense" (1520s), a northern British and Scottish word (see blather (v.)). Related: Blithered; blithering.

Related entries & more 
zoot suit (n.)

1942, American English slang, the first element probably a nonsense reduplication of suit (compare reet pleat, drape shape from the same jargon).

Related entries & more 
fib (n.)

"a lie," especially a little one, "a white lie," 1610s, of uncertain origin, perhaps from fibble-fable "nonsense" (1580s), a reduplication of fable (n.).

Related entries & more 
fudge (n.2)

"nonsense, rubbish," (1791), earlier and more usually as a contemptuous interjection, "lies! nonsense!" Probably a natural extension from fudge (v.) "put together clumsily or dishonestly," q.v. But Farmer suggests provincial French fuche, feuche, "an exclamation of contempt from Low German futsch = begone."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
crap (n.)

1898, "excrement;" see crap (v.). Sense of "rubbish, nonsense" also is attested by 1898.

Related entries & more 
fiddlestick (n.)

15c., originally "the bow of a fiddle," from fiddle (n.) and stick (n.). Meaning "nonsense" (usually fiddlesticks) is from 1620s. As an exclamation, c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
falderol (n.)

also falderal, falderall, folderol, etc., 18c. nonsense words from refrains of songs; meaning "gewgaw, trifle" is attested from 1820.

Related entries & more 
mome (n.)

"buffoon, fool, stupid person," 1550s, from Old French mome "a mask. Related" Momish. The adjective introduced by "Lewis Carroll" is an unrelated nonsense word.

Related entries & more 
bebop (n.)

1944, from bebop, rebop, bop, nonsense words in jazz lyrics, attested from at least 1928. The style is associated with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.

Related entries & more 

Page 2