Etymology
Advertisement
twi-night (adj.)

1939, in reference to evening double-header baseball games, from twilight + night.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
night-owl (n.)

"owl which flies at night," 1590s; applied since 1846 (American English) to persons who are up or out late at night. Compare night-hawk, also French hirondelle de nuit "prostitute," literally "night-swallow."

Related entries & more 
good-night 

phrase in parting for the evening or retiring to sleep, c. 1200, from good (adj.) + night. As an exclamation of surprise from 1893.

Related entries & more 
night-shift (n.)

1710, "garment worn by a woman at night," from night (n. ) + shift (n.2). The meaning "gang of workers employed after dark" is attested from 1839, from shift (n.1).  

Related entries & more 
night-crawler (n.)

"large earthworm caught at night to be used as bait by anglers," by 1896, American English, from night (n.) + agent noun from crawl (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fly-by-night (n.)

1796, slang, said by Grose to be an old term of reproach to a woman signifying that she was a witch; used from 1823 in reference to anyone who departs hastily from a recent activity, especially while owing money. The different senses involve the two verbs fly.

Related entries & more 
noct- 

also nocti-, word-forming element meaning "night, by night, at night," from Latin nox (genitive noctis) "night," from PIE *nekwt- "night" (see night).

Related entries & more 
sightseeing (n.)

also sight-seeing, "a going about for the purpose of seeing interesting places and things," 1821, from sight (see sights) + present participle of see (v.). Sight-see (v.) is from 1824. Sight-seer is recorded by 1821.

Related entries & more 
visual (adj.)

early 15c., "pertaining to the faculty of sight;" also "coming from the eye or sight" (as a beam of light was thought to do), from Late Latin visualis "of sight," from Latin visus "a sight, a looking; power of sight; things seen, appearance," from visus, past participle of videre "to see" (see vision). Meaning "perceptible by sight" is from late 15c; sense of "relating to vision" is first attested c. 1600. The noun meaning "photographic film or other visual display" is first recorded 1944.

Related entries & more 
sighting (n.)

"instance of catching sight, action of looking," 1853, verbal noun from sight (v.).

Related entries & more 

Page 2