Etymology
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newsgroup (n.)

"internet discussion group within the Usenet system containing messages posted from users in different locations," by 1985, from news (n.), perhaps on the notion of sharing news of a particular topic, + group (n.).

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newsroom (n.)

1817, "a reading room, a room where newspapers and sometimes magazines are kept for reading," from news (n.) + room (n.). By 1925 as "office in a newspaper where the news is produced."

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newspaper (n.)

"a sheet containing intelligence or reports of passing events, issued at short but regular intervals," 1660s, newes paper, though the thing itself is older (see gazette); from news (n.) + paper (n.).

[T]he newspaper that drops on your doorstep is a partial, hasty, incomplete, inevitably somewhat flawed and inaccurate rendering of some of the things we have heard about in the past twenty-four hours — distorted, despite our best efforts to eliminate gross bias, by the very process of compression that makes it possible for you to lift it from the doorstep and read it in about an hour. If we labeled the product accurately, then we could immediately add: But it's the best we could do under the circumstances, and we will be back tomorrow with a corrected and updated version. [David Broder, Pulitzer Prize acceptance speech, 1973]
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tidings (n.)

"announcement of an event," c. 1200, from late Old English tidung "event, occurrence, piece of news," verbal noun from Old English tidan "to happen," or in part from Old Norse tiðendi (plural) "events, news," from tiðr (adj.) "occurring," both from Proto-Germanic tīdōjanan, from PIE *di-ti- "division, division of time," suffixed form of root *da- "to divide." Similar formation in Norwegian tidende "tidings, news," Dutch tijding, German Zeitung "newspaper."

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capsulize (v.)

of news, etc., "summarize in compact form," 1950, from capsule + -ize. Related: Capsulized; capsulizing.

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posted (adj.)

"supplied with news or full information," 1828, American English, past-participle adjective from post (v.2).

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censor (v.)

1833, "to act as a censor (of news or public media);" from censor (n.). Related: Censored; censoring.

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Tass (n.)

official news agency of the former U.S.S.R., formed in 1925, an acronym of Russian T'el'egrafnoye ag'enstvo Sov'etskovo Soyuza  "Telegraphic Agency of the Soviet Union."

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leg-work (n.)

also legwork, 1891, from leg (n.) + work (n.). Originally news reporter slang for an assignment that promised more walking than copy.

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evangelism (n.)

1620s, "the preaching of the gospel," from evangel + -ism, or else from Medieval Latin evangelismus "a spreading of the Gospel," from Late Latin evangelium "good news, gospel," from Greek euangelion (see evangelist). In reference to evangelical Protestantism, from 1812.

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