Etymology
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Pericles 

Athenian statesman (c. 495-429 B.C.E.), leader of the city in its period of intellectual and material preeminence, from Latinized form of Greek Perikles, literally "far-famed," from peri "all around" (see peri-) + -kles "fame," a common ending in Greek proper names, related to kleos "rumor, report, news; good report, fame, glory," from PIE *klew-yo-, suffixed form of root *kleu- "to hear." Related: Periclean.

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Cleopatra 

common name of sister-queens in Egypt under the Ptolemaic Dynasty. The name is Latinized Greek, probably meaning "glory of her father," from kleos "rumor, report, news; good report, fame, glory" (from PIE root *kleu- "to hear") + patris, genitive of pater "father" (see father (n.)), though Shipley suggests "key to the fatherland," from kleis "key" (see clavicle). The famous queen was the seventh of that name. Related: Cleopatran.

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announce (v.)

c. 1500, "proclaim, make known formally," from Old French anoncier "announce, proclaim" (12c., Modern French annoncer), from Latin annuntiare, adnuntiare "to announce, make known," literally "bring news to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + nuntiare "relate, report," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Related: Announced; announcing.

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ableism (n.)

by 1990 in feminist and lesbian literature, from able (adj.) + -ism. Defined in 1991 as "bias against the physically challenged and differently abled (formerly the disabled or handicapped) by the temporarily abled. The phrase 'blind to the truth' would be an example of ableist language." [U.S. News & World Report, vol. 110] Related: Ableist.

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rumor (n.)

"unsubstantiated report, gossip, hearsay;" also "tidings, news, a current report with or without foundation," late 14c., from Old French rumor "commotion, widespread noise or report" (Modern French rumeur), from Latin rumorem (nominative rumor) "noise, clamor; common talk, hearsay, popular opinion," which is related to ravus "hoarse" (from PIE *reu- "to bellow").

Dutch rumoer, German Rumor are from French. The sense of "loud protest, clamor, outcry" also was borrowed in Middle English but is now archaic or poetic. Also compare rumorous "making a loud, confused sound" (1540s). Rumor-monger is by 1884 (earlier in that sense was rumorer, c. 1600). The figurative rumor mill is by 1887.

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misreport (v.)

"report incorrectly, give a false report," c. 1400, from mis- (1) + report (v.). Related: Misreported; misreporting.

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Damocles 

flattering courtier of Dionysius I, tyrant of Syracuse; his name in Greek means literally "fame of the people," from dēmos, damos "people" (see demotic) + -kles "fame," a common ending in Greek proper names, related to kleos "rumor, report, news; good report, fame, glory," from PIE *klew-yo-, suffixed form of root *kleu- "to hear." To teach Damocles the peril that accompanies a tyrant's pleasures, Dionysius seated him at a banquet with a sword suspended above his head by a single hair. Hence the figurative use of sword of Damocles, by 1747. Related: Damoclean.

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Hercules 

Greek hero, son of Zeus and Alcmene, worshipped by the Romans as a god of strength, c. 1200 (originally in reference to the Pillars of Hercules), also Ercules, from Latin Hercles (Etruscan Hercle), from Greek Hērakles, literally "Glory of Hera;" from Hera (q.v.) + -kles "fame," a common ending in Greek proper names, related to kleos "rumor, report, news; good report, fame, glory," from PIE *klew-yo-, suffixed form of root *kleu- "to hear."

Used figuratively in reference to strength since late 14c. Vocative form Hercule was a common Roman interjection (especially me Hercule!) "assuredly, certainly." The constellation so called in English by 1670s.

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reported (adj.)

"according to report," 1812, past-participle adjective from report (v.). Related: Reportedly.

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newscast (n.)

"a broadcast of news on radio or (later) television or the internet," 1930, from news + -cast, from broadcast.

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