Etymology
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non-performance (n.)

also nonperformance, "failure or neglect to perform," c. 1500, from non- + performance.

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sluttery (n.)
"neglect of cleanliness and order," 1580s, from slut + -ery. From 1841 as "an untidy room."
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Afghanistan 
1798, from Afghani (see Afghan) + -stan. In journalism, Afghanistanism (1955) was "preoccupation with far-away problems and issues to the neglect of local ones."
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misconduct (n.)

1710, "bad management, neglect;" see mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + conduct (n.). Meaning "wrong conduct" is attested from 1729.

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favoritism (n.)

"disposition to favor one person or family or one class of persons to the neglect of others having equal claims," 1763, from favorite + -ism.

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slight (n.)
1550s, "small amount or weight," from slight (v.). Meaning "act of intentional neglect or ignoring out of displeasure or contempt" is from 1701, probably via 17c. phrase make a slight of (1610s).
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pretermission (n.)

"act of passing by, an omission or disregarding," 1580s, from Latin pretermissionem (nominative pretermissio) "an omission, a passing over," noun of action from past-participle stem of praetermittere "to pass by, let pass, neglect" (see pretermit).

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nonconformity (n.)

also non-conformity, "neglect or failure to conform," especially to some ecclesiastical law or requirement, 1610s, coined in English from non- + conformity. Originally of Church of England clergymen who refused to conform on certain ceremonies (see non-conformist).

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forgo (v.)
"refrain from," Old English forgan "abstain from, leave undone, neglect," also "go or pass over, go away," from for- "away" + gan "go" (see go (v.)). Often, but less properly, forego. Related: Forgoing; forgone.
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postpone (v.)

"put off, defer to a future or later time," c. 1500, from Latin postponere "put after; esteem less; neglect; postpone," from post "after" (see post-) + ponere "put, place" (see position (n.)). Related: Postponed; postponing.

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