Etymology
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anymore (adv.)
one-word form by 1865, from any + more. Typically used with a negative, a custom as old as Middle English, where without any more is found late 14c.
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downside (n.)

also down side, 1680s, "underside;" see down (adv.) + side (n.). Meaning "drawback, negative aspect" is attested by 1995.

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positive (n.)

1520s, originally in grammar, from positive (adj.). Sense of "that which can be affirmed, reality" is from 1610s. Sense in photography (opposite of negative (n.)) is by 1853.

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frills (n.)
"mere embellishments," 1893, often in negative constructions; earlier "affectation of dress or manner" (1845), U.S. colloquial, from frill (n.) "ornamental bordering."
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in toto (adv.)
Latin, "as a whole, wholly, completely, utterly, entirely," from toto, ablative of totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)); "always or nearly always with verbs of negative sense" [Fowler].
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hoarder (n.)

Old English hordere "treasurer," from hoard (n.). As "one who gathers and keeps a stock of something," c. 1500, from hoard (v.). In the negative/disapproving sense of "morbidly overzealous junk collector" by 1964.

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privative (adj.)

late 14c., privatif, "characterized by absence of a quality, characterized by taking away or removal of something," from Latin privativus "denoting privation," in grammar, "negative," from privatus, past participle of privare "to deprive, rob, strip" of anything; "to deliver from" anything" (see private (adj.)).

In grammar, from 1580s as "expressing negation, changing the sense of a word from positive to negative" (as do the prefixes un-, an- (1), in- (1), a- (3), etc.). Related: Privatively.

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trigger (v.)

"cause (something) to happen," 1930, an image from trigger (n.). In recent use especially psychological, "to cause an intense and usually negative emotional reaction (in a person or animal)," by 1986. Related: Triggered; triggering.

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uh 

inarticulate sound, attested from c. 1600; uh-huh, spoken affirmative (often ironic or non-committal) is recorded by 1894; negative uh-uh is attested from 1924.

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yin (n.)
feminine or negative principle in Chinese philosophy, 1670s, from Chinese (Mandarin) yin, said to mean "female, night, lunar," or "shade, feminine, the moon." Compare yang. Yin-yang is from 1850.
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