Etymology
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aglet (n.)

also aiglet, "metal tag of a lace," meant to make it easier to thread through the eyelet-holes, but later often ornamental, mid-15c., from Old French aiguillette, diminutive of aiguille "needle," from Late Latin acucula, an extended form (via diminutive suffix, but not necessarily implying smallness) of Latin acus "a needle," from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce." Compare Italian agucchia, Portuguese agulha, Spanish aguja "needle."

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hypo (n.)
1711, "depression of the spirits," short for hypochondria; 1904 as short for hypodermic needle.
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brooch (n.)
"ornamental clasp consisting of a pin and a covering shield," early 13c., from Old French broche "long needle" (see broach (n.)). Specialized meaning led 14c. to distinct spelling.
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chelicerae (n.)

piercing appendages in the proboscis of scorpions and spiders, 1831, plural of Modern Latin chelicera, from Greek khēlē "crab claw, talon, pincers; cloven hoof of cattle, horse's hoof," metaphorically "surgical forceps, hooked needle, crochet needle, notch of an arrow," a word of uncertain origin with no agreement on ulterior connections (according to Watkins, related to keras "horn," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head"). Earlier chelicer (1835), from French chélicère.

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crochet (v.)

1848, intransitive, "to make a fabric by hooking a thread into meshes with a crochet-needle," from crochet (n.). Transitive sense of "to make in crochet-work" is by 1855. Related: Crocheted; crocheting.

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darning (n.)

"action or process of mending a hole (in fabric) by interweaving yarn or thread," 1610s, verbal noun from darn (v.). Darning-needle is from 1848; darning-stitch from 1881.

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acicular (adj.)

"resembling or in the form of small needles," 1794, from Latin acicula "needle, small pin," diminutive of acus "pin" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

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jab (n.)
1825, "a thrust or poke with the point of something," from jab (v.). Meaning "a punch with the fist" is from 1889. Sense of "injection with a hypodermic needle," once beloved by newspaper headline writers, is from 1914.
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aculeate (adj.)

c. 1600, figurative, "pointed, stinging," of writing, from Latin aculeatus "having a sting; thorny, prickly," also figurative, from aculeus "a sting, prickle," diminutive of acus "a needle" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce"). From 1660s in a literal sense, in zoology, "furnished with a sting;" 1870 in botany.

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dragonfly (n.)

common name of a neuropterous predatory insect of the group Libellulina, with a long, slender body, large eyes, and two pairs of large, membranous wings, 1620s, from dragon + fly (n.). An older name for it was adderbolt (late 15c.), for its shape, also devil's darning-needle.

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