Etymology
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optometrist (n.)

"one whose profession is to measure the range and power of vision," 1903; see optometry + -ist.

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Panavision (n.)

1955, proprietary name of a type of wide-screen lens, a word formed from elements of panorama + vision.

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vue 
French, literally "view, sight; aspect, appearance; vision" (see view (n.)).
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televangelist (n.)
1973, from tele(vision) + evangelist. Earliest usages are in reference to Rex Humbard (television evangelist is from 1958).
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blinkered (adj.)

in the figurative sense, 1849, from horses wearing blinkers to limit the range of their vision (see blinker).

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eye-shot (n.)
also eyeshot, "range of vision," 1580s, from eye (n.) + shot (n.) in the sense of "range" (as in bowshot).
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approximate (adj.)

1640s, "near in position, close to," from Late Latin approximatus, past participle of approximare "to come near to," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + proximare "come near," from proximus "nearest," superlative of prope "near" (see propinquity).

The meaning "near in accuracy or correctness" is by 1816. It also was used in Middle English in a sense of "similar" (early 15c.).

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blindfold (n.)
1880, "something wrapped around the head over the eyes to take away vision," from blindfold (v.). Earlier in this sense was blindfolder (1640s).
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voila (interj.)
1739, French voilà, imperative of voir "to see, to view" (from Latin videre "to see;" see vision) + la "there" (from Latin ille "yonder;" see le).
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nearby (adv.)

also near-by, "close at hand, not far off," late 14c., from near (adv.) + by (adv.). As a preposition from mid-15c.; as an adjective by 1858. Middle English also had ner-honde "near-hand; near in space or time" (c. 1300).

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