Etymology
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frap (v.)
"to strike, smite," early 14c., from Old French fraper "to strike, hit, beat," in nautical use "fix, fasten" (12c., Modern French frapper), cognate with Italian frappare "to strike," which is of unknown origin, perhaps imitative (compare rap (n.)). Nautical sense of "bind tightly" is from 1540s. Related: Frapped; frapping.
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shin (v.)
"to climb by using arms and legs" (originally a nautical word), 1829, from shin (n.). Related: Shinned; shinning.
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upwind (adv.)
also up-wind, 1838, from up (adv.) + wind (n.1). Originally a nautical term. As an adjective from 1892.
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coaming (n.)

1610s, nautical, "raised border or edge of a hatch" (to prevent water on deck from running below), of unknown origin.

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awash (adj.)
1825, originally nautical, "on the level of, flush with" the water, from a- (1) "on" + wash (n.). Figurative use by 1912.
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aftward (adv.)
Old English æftewearde; see aft + -ward. The original form of afterward (q.v.), retained in nautical use. Related: Aftwards.
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gybe (v.1)
"swing from one side to the other," nautical, 1690s, probably from older Dutch gijben, related to German gieben, of uncertain origin.
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bunk (v.)
"to sleep in a bunk," by 1840, originally nautical, from bunk (n.1). Hence "to occupy a bed." Related: Bunked; bunking.
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portsider (n.)

"left-handed person," 1913, American English baseball slang, from port (n.4) in the nautical sense + side (n.).

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galoot (n.)
1812, nautical, "raw recruit, green hand," apparently originally a sailor's contemptuous word for soldiers or marines, of unknown origin. "Dictionary of American Slang" proposes galut, Sierra Leone creole form of Spanish galeoto "galley slave." In general (non-nautical) use by 1866, "awkward or boorish man," but often a term of humorous contempt.
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